New Study Confirms That Private Schools Are No Better Than Public Schools

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New Study Confirms That Private Schools Are No Better Than Public Schools
The results of a new study show that private school education may be no better than public school education. Keep reading to learn more about this study and to learn how to make the right choice between private and public school education for your child.

The results of a new study show that private school education may be no better than public school education. Keep reading to learn more about this study and to learn how to make the right choice between private and public school education for your child.

The world of education is ever changing but opinions about private versus public school will always be at odds. It is a common assumption that private school education is of a higher quality than public school education, but the results of a new study suggest that this may not be the case.

After reviewing data from over 1,000 students, researchers from the University of Virginia found no evidence to suggest that students from low-income families and children enrolled in urban schools benefited more from private than from public school education. These results are particularly relevant as legislators fight to move toward more a more privatized public education system. They also make it clear that the assumption that public schools are inferior to private schools is wrong.

The fact of the matter is that some schools are simply better than others, but the results of this new study suggest that the factors once thought to play the largest role in determining the quality of public versus private education may not be so important. In order to better understand the results of this study, let’s first take a closer look at some of the supposed benefits of private versus public school.

The Supposed Benefits of Private vs. Public School

According

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Why Every High School Student Should Apply for Financial Aid
Each year, millions of students neglect to fill out the FAFSA and, in doing so, miss out on the chance to receive federal student aid. Keep reading to learn why every high school student should apply for financial aid, whether or not they qualify and regardless of their intention to use it.

The cost of college tuition rises each and every year. Though many students struggle to fund their college education, there are others who are lucky enough that they don’t need to borrow money for school. Even if a high school student doesn’t plan to borrow money to pay their tuition, however, it is still wise to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

According to a new report sent out by the National Center for Education Statistics, there are many reasons why high school students fail to fill out the FAFSA and some of them are due to misconceptions. Keep reading to learn why every high school student should apply for financial aid, whether or not they qualify and regardless of their intention to use it.

What is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?

According to recent data from College Board, the average annual cost to attend an in-state public college is about $25,000. For private colleges, that price doubles to over $50,000. While there are certainly students whose families are wealthy enough to pay for tuition without assistance, the great majority of incoming college students require financial aid to fund their higher education.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the form colleges and universities use to determine a student’s eligibility for federal, state, and school-sponsored financial aid. This includes educational loans, grants, and work-study programs. Even if a student only plans to take advantage of state or college-sponsored financial aid, they are

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What Are Public Schools Doing to Fight Obesity and Is It Working?
Childhood obesity rates continue to climb. While many public schools have implemented policies and programs to combat the problem, there is always more to be done. Keep reading to learn what schools are doing to prevent obesity and how you can help.

The times are always changing and what was considered normal a few decades ago may no longer be the case. While change is often a good thing, sometimes it isn’t – that is the case with the rising prevalence of obesity among children. Childhood obesity rates are ever-climbing, and it has become something of an epidemic in the United States.

While obesity may seem like nothing more than an aesthetic issue, body weight has a significant impact on health and wellness – especially for children. Children who are overweight or obese are much more likely to become obese adults and that puts them at right for a whole host of dangerous health problems that could negatively impact their lifespan and their quality of life. As a parent, it is your job to provide for your children and to keep them happy and healthy. If your child is overweight or obese, don’t play it off as a minor issue – step up and do something about it!

In this article, we’ll talk about the problem of childhood obesity and what public schools are doing to prevent it. We’ll also discuss some at-home tips you can implement to help your child achieve and maintain a healthy body weight.

Identifying the Problem: Obesity in Children and Adolescents

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, over 78 million adults and more than 12 million children in the United States are obese. These numbers qualify obesity as a problem of epidemic proportions, and the problem only

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Tips for Parents of Public School Children with Food Allergies
Food allergies are no laughing matter and it doesn't take long for them to become dangerous. Keep reading to learn how to keep your child safe at school if he has a food allergy.

As a parent, it is your job to worry about your child but worrying won’t protect him or her. When you send your child to school, you are giving up control and placing his care in the hands of his teachers and administrators. If your child suffers from a food allergy, going to school could put him at risk for accidental exposure to his allergen.

While you can’t enclose your child in a plastic bubble to protect him, there are simple steps you can take to keep him safe at school. Keep reading to learn more about food allergies in children and to receive tips for keeping your child safe when he is at school.

How Common Are Food Allergies in Children?

According to the Food Allergy Research & Education Corporation, there are more than 170 foods that have been reported to cause allergic reactions. The eight primary food allergens are milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish. Current estimates suggest that roughly 15 million Americans suffer from food allergies, including nearly 6 million children under the age of 18.

A food allergy is more than just a sensitivity to a certain type of food – it is a medical condition triggered by exposure to an allergen which induces a harmful immune response in the body. Allergies can range in severity, but some of the most common symptoms include the following:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Wheezing
  • Coughing
  • Hoarseness
  • Throat tightness
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Itchy eyes
  • Swollen eyes
  • Stomach pain
  • Hives
  • Swelling

In some cases, you may also experience a drop in blood pressure which can

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Why Are Things Becoming More Difficult for Public School Teachers?
Being a teacher has never been easy but changes in federal funding and legislation have made it harder than ever for public school teachers. Keep reading to learn more.

Public school teachers have a wonderful opportunity to shape the minds of the next generation. There is a great deal of satisfaction that comes from making an impact on a child’s life, but being a teacher isn’t always easy – especially in public school.

Teachers have always faced challenges but, in recent years, it seems to be getting more and more difficult for public school teachers to do their jobs well. Keep reading to learn about some of the current challenges facing public school teachers and what they could mean for the future.

What Are the Biggest Challenges Teachers Face?

With changes in public policy and legislation, the U.S. education system is constantly changing. Before we get into the details about recent changes which have introduced new challenges for public school teachers, let’s discuss some of the ongoing challenges teachers face in general. Here are a few:

  • Poorly behaved students
  • Limited resources and finances
  • Difficult parents
  • Federal requirements and standardized tests
  • Time constraints

It is difficult enough to wrangle an elementary-age child but being responsible for a classroom full of them is another challenge entirely. When you throw in behavioral problems, it only makes it more difficult. Not only do you have to deal with poorly behaved students, but because you are forced to dedicate extra time to those students, the rest of the class may be neglected. Plus, taking the time to deal with behavioral problems takes away time you could be teaching.

Another major challenge that public-school teachers face is limited resources and financial constraints. Many

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The results of a new study show that private school education may be no better than public school education. Keep reading to learn more about this study and to learn how to make the right choice between private and public school education for your child.
Each year, millions of students neglect to fill out the FAFSA and, in doing so, miss out on the chance to receive federal student aid. Keep reading to learn why every high school student should apply for financial aid, whether or not they qualify and regardless of their intention to use it.