Top District of Columbia Magnet Public Schools

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  • For the 2018-19 school year, there are 6 top magnet public schools in District of Columbia, serving 3,923 students.
  • Learn more about how magnet schools work. Minority enrollment is 93% of the student body (majority Black), which is more than the District of Columbia state average of 90%.
  • The student:teacher ratio of 15:1 is more than the state average of 12:1.

Top District of Columbia Magnet Public Schools (2018-19)

  • School Location Grades Students
  • Washington Benjamin Banneker High School Magnet School
    800 Euclid St Nw
    Washington, DC 20001
    (202)671-6320

    Grades: 9-12 | 454 students
  • Washington Columbia Heights Ec Magnet School
    3101 16th St Nw
    Washington, DC 20010
    (202)939-7700

    Grades: 6-12 | 1393 students
  • Washington Ellington School Of Arts Magnet School
    2501 11th St Nw
    Washington, DC 20001
    (202)282-0123

    Grades: 9-12 | 525 students
  • Washington Mckinley Technology High School Magnet School
    151 T St Ne
    Washington, DC 20002
    (202)281-3950

    Grades: 9-12 | 656 students
  • Washington Phelps Architecture Construction And Engineering High School Magnet School
    704 26th St Ne
    Washington, DC 20003
    (202)729-4360

    Grades: 9-12 | 306 students
  • Washington School Without Walls High School Magnet School
    2130 G St Nw
    Washington, DC 20037
    (202)645-9690

    Grades: 9-12 | 589 students
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