Monmouth Regional High School

Monmouth Regional High School serves 1,008 students in grades 9-12.
The student:teacher ratio of 10:1 is lower than the NJ average of 12:1.
Minority enrollment is 38% of the student body (majority Black and Hispanic), which is less than the state average of 49%.
Monmouth Regional High School operates within the Monmouth Regional H S Di School District.

Overview

The student population of 1008 students has stayed relatively flat over five years.
The teacher population of 100 teachers has grown by 8% over five years.
Grades Offered Grades 9-12
Total Students 1,008 students
Monmouth Regional High School Total Students (1988-2012)
Gender % 50% Male / 50%Female
Total Classroom Teachers 100 teachers
Monmouth Regional High School Total Classroom Teachers (1988-2012)
Students by Grade Monmouth Regional High School Students by Grade

School Comparison

The student:teacher ratio of 10:1 has stayed the same over five years.
The school's diversity score of 0.58 is less than the state average of 0.66. The school's diversity has stayed relatively flat over five years.
This School (NJ) School Average
Student : Teacher Ratio 10:1 12:1
Monmouth Regional High School Student : Teacher Ratio (1988-2012)
American Indian
n/a
n/a
Asian
6%
9%
Monmouth Regional High School Asian (1988-2012)
Hispanic
12%
23%
Monmouth Regional High School Hispanic (1988-2012)
Black
15%
17%
Monmouth Regional High School Black (1988-2012)
White
62%
51%
Monmouth Regional High School White (1988-2012)
All Ethnic Groups Monmouth Regional High School Sch Ethnicity Monmouth Regional High School Sta Ethnicity
Diversity Score
The chance that two students selected at random would be members of a different ethnic group. Scored from 0 to 1, a diversity score closer to 1 indicates a more diverse student body.
0.58 0.66
Monmouth Regional High School Diversity Score (1988-2012)
Eligible for Free Lunch
Families meeting income eligibility guidelines may qualify for free and reduced price meals or free milk. These guidelines are used by schools, institutions, and facilities participating in the National School Lunch Program (and Commodity School Program), School Breakfast Program, Special Milk Program for Children, Child and Adult Care Food Program and Summer Food Service Program.
6%
29%
Monmouth Regional High School Eligible for Free Lunch (1990-2012)
Eligible for Reduced
Lunch
Families meeting income eligibility guidelines may qualify for free and reduced price meals or free milk. These guidelines are used by schools, institutions, and facilities participating in the National School Lunch Program (and Commodity School Program), School Breakfast Program, Special Milk Program for Children, Child and Adult Care Food Program and Summer Food Service Program.
3%
6%
Monmouth Regional High School Eligible for Reduced Lunch (2000-2012)

District Comparison

The district's student population of 1,008 students has stayed relatively flat over five years.
School District Name Monmouth Regional H S Di School District
Number of Schools
Managed
1
2
Number of Students Managed 1,008 919
Graduation Rate n/a 92%
Monmouth Regional H S  Di School District Graduation Rate (1994-2005)
District Total Revenue $29 MM $20 MM
Monmouth Regional H S  Di School District Total Revenue (1990-2009)
District Spending $26 MM $19 MM
Monmouth Regional H S  Di School District Spending (1990-2009)
District Revenue / Student $28,237 $20,414
District Spending / Student $25,865 $19,395
School Statewide Testing View Education Department Test Scores
Source: 2012 (latest year available) NCES, NJ Dept. of Education

School Notes:

  • Monmouth Regional High School is a regional, four-year public high school and public school district in Tinton Falls, Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  • The school serves students from Eatontown, Shrewsbury Township and Tinton Falls. Students also come from the military installations of Fort Monmouth and Naval Weapons Station Earle.
  • Board of Education: The district is governed by a nine-member Board of Education. Board members are elected to serve three-year terms, with three seats coming up for election each year. Of the nine members, four each come from both Eatontown and Tinton Falls, and one from Shrewsbury Township.
  • School: The high school is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and is approved by the New Jersey Department of Education.
  • Special systems are in place to service the needs of youngsters from the transient military populations from the two bases.
  • Curriculum: Advanced Placement Program (AP) courses are offered in AP Art History, AP Biology, AP Calculus, AP Chemistry, AP Computer Science, AP English Language and Composition, AP French Language, AP Latin Literature, AP Spanish Language, AP United States History, AP Psychology, AP United States Government and Politics and AP European History. Honors level courses are offered in the five academic disciplines and in advanced elective offerings in the applied technology area. In order to meet the needs of our diverse population, a wide array of interesting courses supplement the traditional high school curriculum such as Great Books, Humanities, Minorities Studies, Cisco Academy, Electronics, CADD, Cooperative Education, Photography and Video/Film Studies and Drama. Articulated programs with Brookdale Community College and Ramapo College make it possible for students to earn college credits while in high school. “Futuresâ€, a competitive elective program for the Gifted, is designed to develop students’ critical thinking and problem solving abilities. Students also have the Opportunity to take part in research opportunities, such as the Waksman Institute at Rutgers University.
  • In addition to passing the High School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA), all graduates must successfully complete a minimum of 120 credits, including 4 years each of English and Physical Education / Health, 3 years of Mathematics, 3 years of Science, 2 years of U.S. History, 1 year of World History, 1 year of a foreign language and 2 years of Fine / Performing / Practical Arts.
  • Athletics: The Monmouth Regional High School Falcons compete in the Shore Conference an athletic conference comprised of private and public high schools centered at the Northern Jersey Shore. All schools in the conference are located within Monmouth County and Ocean County. The league operates under the jurisdiction of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA).
  • Source: Wikipedia; it is used under the GNU Free Documentation License. You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the GFDL

Nearby Schools:

The nearest high school is Kiva High School (0.2 miles away).
The nearest middle school is Tinton Falls Middle School (0.4 miles away)
The nearest elementary school is Mahala F Atchison Elementary School (0.8 miles away)
 All Schools  |High Schools High Schools  |Middle Schools Middle Schools  |Elementary Elementary  |Pre-K Pre-K  |Private Schools Private Schools 
Show me:
  • School Location Miles Students Grades
  • Tinton Falls Kiva High School
    Special Education School
    537 Tinton Ave
    Tinton Falls , NJ , 07724
    (732)542-5455
    Special Education School
    0.2  mi  |  12  students  |  Gr.  9-12
  • Tinton Falls Tinton Falls Middle School
    674 Tinton Ave
    Tinton Falls , NJ , 07724
    (732)542-0775
    0.4  mi  |  536  students  |  Gr.  6-8
  • Tinton Falls Mahala F Atchison Elementary School
    961 Sycamore Ave
    Tinton Falls , NJ , 07724
    (732)542-2500
    0.8  mi  |  665  students  |  Gr.  PK-3
  • Eatontown Margaret L Vetter Elementary School
    3 Grant Ave
    Eatontown , NJ , 07724
    (732)542-4644
    1.5  mi  |  245  students  |  Gr.  KG-6
  • Eatontown Memorial Middle School
    7 Grant Ave
    Eatontown , NJ , 07724
    (732)542-5013
    1.5  mi  |  235  students  |  Gr.  7-8

School Reviews

  • Recommended December 14, 2009 - Please do not send your child to this school. I don't know what they do with the money the get for the school but it is falling apart and the school rules are odd and do not favor many parents wishes and inconvenience both them and the students. I have heard of students failing and fighting and getting expelled and i do not believe that the teachers help that at all. Nobody in that school, student or teacher, is respectful and there are conflicts between the two. I would recommend sending your kid to another local school or just not moving to this area at all. I wish i didn't keep my kid in this school as long as i did, as it has lowered her chances of getting into a good college. I blame this mostly on the teachers that did not try to help her when I asked them myself. - Posted by Parent

Reviews should be a few sentences in length. Please include any comments on:

  • Quality of academic programs, teachers, and facilities
  • Availability of music, art, sports and other extracurricular activities

I am a:

Email: (we will not reveal your email)

Your review:

Would you recommend this school?

Add School Reviews - Recommended Yes     Add School Reviews - Not Recommended No

Area Statistics

Recent Public School Articles
10 Money-Saving Tips for Back-to-School Shopping
10 Money-Saving Tips for Back-to-School Shopping
One of the most stressful parts of back-to-school season is making sure your children get everything they need, without breaking the bank. Here are 10 expert back-to-school shopping tips to get what you need on a budget.
Knowledge is Power Program: A Strong Model for Public Schools
As many traditional public schools struggle to close the achievement gap, Knowledge is Power Program schools seem to have the right formula for helping poverty-stricken and minority students achieve success. In this article, we examine how KIPP schools are making their students’ futures much brighter.
Urban Public Schools Come to the Rescue of Black Boys
Public schools across the nation are implementing programs that help keep young black men in school and off the streets. Boosting graduation rates, reducing gang involvement and violence, and providing positive male role models are just a few of the common elements of these programs. Yet, the achievement gap between black boys and other peer groups remains extremely wide.