About Public Schools

Here we cover the history of public schools, explain the various types and discuss their pros/cons. Learn more about technology on campus, health and nutrition issues, and the latest information related to a variety of student populations.
View the most popular articles in About Public Schools:
Updated November 09, 2016 |
Should Your Child Go to College Right After High School?
For some students, attending college immediately after high school is not the right choice. Keep reading to learn more about the pros and cons of this decision and to learn about some alternative options.

For many high school seniors, going to college after graduation is a given. But going to college immediately after high school is not the right choice for everyone. Keep reading to learn more about the pros and cons for attending college right after high school and to learn about some alternative options that may be available to you.

Reasons to Go to College After High School

While transitioning into college immediately after high school may not be the right choice for everyone, there certainly are some significant benefits you need to consider. Here are some things you should think about when deciding whether to take a year off before college:

  • Some studies have shown that many students who wait instead of going to college immediately after high school never end up going at all. In you take a job right after high school you may find yourself putting it off year after year and it could hurt you in the long run.
  • According to a Huffington Post report, those who choose not to go to college at all make as much as $800,000 less than college graduates over the course of their lifetime. Even if you only take a year off, you could be cutting into your lifetime salary.
  • If you do not go to college right after high school you could miss out on some life-changing experiences that can shape who you are and what you believe in. The habits and opinions you form as a young adult will stay with you for
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Updated May 30, 2016 |
Measles in School: A Parent’s Guide in 2015
Measles, the once eradicated disease, has made a comeback in the U.S. in recent months, and a recent study estimates only 50% of people are immunized. The outbreak has raised questions about immunizations and the safety of children in public schools. Learn how to keep your children healthy and reduce their measles risk.
Just three months after the first measles outbreak from Disneyland, researchers have confirmed that the low rates of vaccination are the culprit for measles spreading from California throughout the country, as just published in the JAMA Pediatric Journal
 
"Disneyland is an international attraction and sometimes people are coming from places where measles vaccination rates are low or they don't get the recommended two doses, and that, combined with the fact that there are a lot of pockets of non-vaccination in California and people coming from all over the U.S. created the perfect storm for a big outbreak," lead author Maimuna Majumder of Boston Children's Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told Reuters Health.
 
In late December 2014, the first signs that a measles outbreak was about to occur began to present themselves. People were coming into emergency rooms and doctor’s offices with high fevers, runny noses, coughing, and red, watery eyes.  In addition to the ones originating in Disneyland, there were other unrelated outbreaks in Nevada, Illinois, and Washington.  California has by far the most cases, numbering 142 in early March, but there are measles reports in 17 states and the District of Columbia, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  
What makes this measles outbreak particularly disturbing – aside from the fact that the disease was declared eliminated in 2000 – is that it began at Disneyland, a place full of children who have since returned to school.
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Updated March 25, 2015
The Surprising Way Schools are Saving Money on Ed Tech
With technology advancing and changing faster than ever, how can educators and schools keep up? The answer: refurbished ed tech.
With technology advancing and changing faster than ever, how can educators and schools keep up? The answer: refurbished ed tech.
 
The Emergence of Refurbished Ed Tech
 
Teachers and administrators are turning to refurbished educational technology for better learning experiences on a reduced budget. Refurbished machines save time and money, and gives instructors a wider range of teaching options for students. We paneled some of the top minds in education to learn about the impact refurbished tech is making on education.
 
The Benefits of Refurbished Ed Tech: Savings
 
School systems across the nation run on tight budgets. While per-student spending remains at an adequate level in select districts, it can hardly cover the cost of new devices for every child, especially with rapid advances in digital media.
 
“Refurbished technology is a great way to get more devices into the hands of students at significant cost savings,” says Robert Baker, CEO and Co-Founder of certified ed tech provider Mac to School. Teachers need the proper tools to interact with their students in a technology-driven society.
 
Bob Nelson, Superintendent of the Chawanakee School District in California, notes the benefits of saving time as well as money. “What are the benefits of refurbished ed tech… identical machines, thus simplifying the 1:1 environment for purposes of training and support.”
 
His own experience of working with identical devices at the district level over the past six years has given him keen insights into the savings refurbished equipment provide.
How Ed Tech Has Changed: Access and Efficacy
 
In an age
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Updated February 01, 2015
Why Students and Schools Benefit from Foreign Language Programs
It’s clear there is currently a gap in language education. As of 2008, only 18.5% of K-12 students were enrolled in a foreign language class. Ask the experts and they all agree— schools with robust foreign language programs can bring students to the next level.
Ask the experts and they all agree— schools with robust foreign language programs can bring students to the next level.
 
Public schools that invest in foreign language, whether through a full-fledged program or just a few classes, are certain to see the benefit in their student body, extracurriculars, and overall reputation. Full language programs start at an early age, immersing children in language classes every year from K-12, with extracurricular clubs, field trips, and learning experiences to enhance their language education. 
 
It’s clear there is currently a gap in language education. As of 2008, only 18.5% of K-12 students were enrolled in a foreign language class. From 1997 to 2008, public and private elementary schools offering foreign language instruction decreased from 31% to 25%. These numbers are simply not acceptable.
 
There are many reasons why schools, even those at the most elementary levels, should institute a foreign language program into their core curriculum. Dr. Jennifer Austin, an associate language professor at Rutgers University, is an adamant believer in the benefits of language studies. “Researchers have found that there are lifelong cognitive and academic benefits to becoming bilingual.”
 
Robert Riger, Vice President and Director of Pimsleur Language Programs, believes foreign language is the gateway to the rest of the world. “At an age where students begin to form individual preferences, dreams, and set priorities, it’s a clear road map to the next step. For many, it’s a passport to global citizenship, to dreams of connection with future friends and with their
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Updated November 11, 2014 |
White Students are Now the Minority in U.S. Public Schools
Increasing birth rates among immigrant families from Asia and Central and South America, combined with lower birth rates among white families, means that for the first time in history, public school students in the United States are majority-minority. This shift in demographics poses difficulties for schools as they work to accommodate children of varying language abilities and socio-economic backgrounds.
It has been an ongoing trend for nearly two decades – while the total number of students in American public schools has risen, the percentage of those students who are white has steadily fallen. According to the Pew Research Center, in 1997, over 63 percent of the 46.1 million U.S. public school students were white. Today, white students comprise just 49.7 percent of the 50 million students enrolled.
 
These changes in the racial make-up of the nation’s public schools are reflective of where the overall population is headed. According to recent estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2060, the white population in this country is projected to fall by more than 20 million people, while the Hispanic population is set to double. Black and Asian populations are expected to increase as well, although at rates far slower than Hispanics. By 2043, the nation as a whole is projected to become majority-minority.
Public School Diversity
 
While the white student population has declined by 15 percent since 1997, according to Pew, both Hispanic and Asian populations have rapidly increased. In that same time frame, the number of Hispanic students has grown by 50 percent to 12.9 million students. The number of Asian students has also seen significant growth, jumping 46 percent to 2.9 million students. The African-American student population, which this fall will number 7.7 million, has remained relatively steady over the last twenty years.
 
Much has been made recently of the number of migrant
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Recent Articles
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It is never too early to start prepping for college by engaging in some extra-curricular activities that will help you to show a college admissions team who you are and what you believe in.
December 06, 2016
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About Public Schools

Overview of Public Schools

A comprehensive look at the U.S. public school system, including history, governing bodies, funding, and services. Compare private, public and charter schools. Learn more about Magnet school programs and get tips on choosing the right school for your child.

Types of Public Schools

Explore the different types of public schools, from charter to language immersion, and learn about the unique pros and cons of each type. Is a co-ed or single sex classroom best for your child? Charter school or magnet? Read expert advice and get valuable tips on the various public education programs available and how to choose what works best for your family.

Technology on Campus

From eBooks to web cams, technology on campus continues to grow. Learn how the latest technology impacts your child’s education. Get tips on the best ways to integrate technology into education and stay abreast of the latest developments and challenges facing schools.

Health and Nutrition at School

From vending machines to Jamie Oliver, bed bugs to tuberculosis, we provide an in-depth look at health and wellness in public schools. Help your kids stay healthy on campus and learn about current health epidemics, vaccination requirements, physical fitness programs and the latest food initiatives.

Back to School

Learn more about preparing your child and wallet for a new school year. Inside you’ll find valuable advice to help your family prepare for the transition from swimsuits to school. While there is no tuition, public school education does not come without costs. Learn more about budgeting for a new school year and get great money saving tips.

Student Populations

The latest trends, laws and resources for a variety of student populations. Every child has different needs, and this section offers helpful information for LGBT, special education, gifted, low-income, and minority students.