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Post-Pandemic Tips for Public School Parents and Students
The 2020-21 school year was unlike any other and hopefully not one we’ll repeat anytime soon. The COVID-19 pandemic changed the face of America’s public education system and we’re still seeing the effects. In this article, we’ll explore the impact of the pandemic on America’s public schools, see how they responded, and talk about some tips for returning to in-person education this fall.

After a year and a half struggling to survive a global pandemic, the world is finally starting to get back to normal. Though challenges brought by the rising Delta variant still exist, many schools are planning to return to in-person instruction in the coming fall. This news comes as a welcome relief to parents who have had to juggle supervising their child’s remote education while continuing to work their own jobs.

Though the COVID-19 pandemic left no one unaffected, it exacerbated a number of existing issues within the public school system and created some new challenges. Returning to school in the fall of 2021 won’t be smooth sailing and parents had better start preparing themselves (and their children) now to ensure as seamless a transition as possible.

In this article, we’ll explore some of the effects the COVID-19 pandemic had on public school systems and talk about what the future holds. We’ll also provide helpful tips for students, parents, and educators as they anticipate their return to school in the fall.

Impact of the Pandemic on Public Schools

In March of 2020, the World Health Organization declared the spread of COVID-19 a worldwide pandemic. Being in the middle of their second semester, schools across the country (and around the world) were sent scrambling to make adjustments. Many schools closed for in-person instruction entirely, switching to virtual learning, and many parents withdrew their children from schools entirely in favor of teaching them at home.

In a March 2021 article published on Brookings, Daphna

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The Current State of Special Education in the U.S.

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The Current State of Special Education in the U.S.
The COVID-19 pandemic has turned the world on its head. The effects of the global pandemic will be felt for years to come, though maybe more so in certain populations. Here’s what you need to know about the current state of special education in the United States.

The term “special” is typically used to describe something that is better or greater than the average. In terms of education, however, the term is often used to describe students who are different or differently abled. Special education focuses on helping children with disabilities learn and, just as every student is different, so are the various approaches to special education.

Parents and teachers have always had their work cut out for them when it comes to educating and caring for special needs students, but the COVID-19 pandemic has created new challenges that may last for years to come. In this article, we’ll discuss the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on special education and provide useful information for both parents and teachers.

What is Special Education?

The term “special education” generally refers to a set of services provided to students who have unique learning needs. In terms of federal law, according to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), however, special education is defined as: “Specially designed instruction, at no cost to parents, to meet the unique needs of a child with a disability.”

In order to qualify for special education services, students must have an identified disability that affects their ability to learn. Eligible disabilities may include the following:

  • Intellectual disabilities
  • Speech or language impairment
  • Hearing impairment
  • Visual impairment
  • Serious emotional disturbance
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Orthopedic impairments
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Developmental delay
  • Specific learning disabilities

 Federal law requires schools to provide an appropriate education for all of their students with disabilities, regardless their disability or its severity. It also requires that six

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Managing Stress and Moving Forward from the Pandemic

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Managing Stress and Moving Forward from the Pandemic
As more schools return to in-person learning, teachers and parents find themselves dealing with the trauma and stress created by the pandemic.

After a long and difficult year, there is finally a light at the end of the tunnel. With over 60% of the U.S. population having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, things are looking up. COVID restrictions are being lifted, businesses are reopening, and children are returning to school. Though we have much to be thankful for, the scars left behind by a dark and challenging year won’t soon fade.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the state of the American public education system in deep and sometimes disturbing ways. Existing disparities between affluent children and low-income students have grown and it may take years of hard work and massive change to overcome them. What many educators are focusing on now as the world starts to return to normal isn’t catching students up on lost education in core subjects like math and science – it’s helping them cope with the stress of a year-long pandemic.

Millions of children around the globe have suffered from a year of isolation from friends and sporadic education. In this article, we’ll explore the subject of pandemic-related stress and provide helpful tips for parents and educators to support their children in the upcoming school year.

Traumatic Stress Caused by the COVID-19 Pandemic

Adam D. Brown, PsyD, a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU Longone discusses the notion of traumatic stress in children and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected millions of children in some very negative ways. A

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How Has the Pandemic Changed Public School?

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How Has the Pandemic Changed Public School?
After more than a year of remote learning, schools are finally returning to in-person instruction but how has the pandemic changed the face of public education and what will it look like moving forward?

Just a few months after the dawn of a new decade, millions of parents found themselves scrambling to adjust to remote learning in the midst of a rapidly spreading global pandemic. It didn’t take long for parents to realize just how much they’d been leaning on the public school system until their kids were at home full-time. Parents became teachers overnight, struggling to maintain some sense of normalcy in regard to their child’s education, all while trying to manage changes in their own day-to-day lives.

A full year later, parents and educators are still struggling, and the country is facing some difficult questions about the state of America’s public school system. In some cities, affluent families have abandoned the public school system in favor of private schools but what effect with this mass exodus have on the future of public schooling? In this article, we’ll explore the ways the pandemic has changed public school systems and what parents can expect in the future.

The Current State of Public Education

After months of remote learning, many schools have started to return to in-person education. Though many schools are following a blended approach, teaching students both in-person and virtually, parents are finally starting to see a return to “normal” after a year of chaos. What school really looks like for students varies, however, depending on a variety of factors.

In some communities, schools are only open to teachers and administrators who continue to teach remotely. Other districts have opened their doors to students but continue

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A Parent’s Guide for the Upcoming School Year

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A Parent’s Guide for the Upcoming School Year
As the nation works to recover from COVID-19, parents wonder what the fall of 2020 holds in terms of the upcoming school year. Read on to learn some tips for preparing for potential challenges and to see the answers to some of the biggest questions being asked by parents of school-age children.

The coronavirus pandemic has made its way around the world, changing the lives of millions all in the span of a few months. In the United States, many state governors issued stay-at-home orders that not only closed nonessential businesses and limited travel, but closed schools as well. Parents and teachers alike were forced to suddenly navigate the challenges of remote learning, some with more success than others. As things start to get back to “normal” in many states, parents are left wondering what the upcoming school year will look like and how they should prepare.

In this article, we’ll explore the subject of the upcoming 2020-21 school year and what it might look like. We’ll talk about the pros and cons of homeschooling as well and provide some tips for protecting your children if you choose to send them back to school.

Will Schools Be Open in the Fall?

Most Americans expect schools to reopen in the fall, but even if they do your child may not be returning to the same school they left in March. In a USA Today poll, 1 in 5 teachers revealed that they are unlikely to return to the classroom if their school reopens in the fall.

It’s no secret that the coronavirus pandemic upended our way of life, but even as many states begin to reopen we may be feeling the effects well into the next year. When it comes to the upcoming 2020-21 school year, there are no clear answers yet. The details

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