Tips to Maintain Your Child’s Education During School Closures

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Tips to Maintain Your Child’s Education During School Closures
Schools all over the country have closed their doors to slow the spread of COVID-19, forcing educators and parents to switch to online learning strategies. Read on to learn where to start with homeschooling and for helpful resources for learning at home.

In early March, the spread of COVID-19 became an issue lawmakers and educators could no longer ignore. The difficult decision was made in many states to close the doors of public and private schools, moving children to online learning from home. In the hopes that social distancing will slow the spread of the virus, families find themselves dealing with the challenges of working and schooling from home.

In this article, we’ll explore the challenges associated with online learning and the impact of widespread school closures. We’ll also talk about how to establish a homeschooling routine and provide some useful resources for online learning and educational ideas for children and families.

Challenges Associated with Online Learning

As schools all over the country closed their doors, a wave of panic spread through the community. Though many schools announced an initial 2-week closure, others offered no end date.

Not only have these closures resulted in an interruption of education, but they also have a negative impact on other aspects of a child’s life. The stability that comes from a daily school schedule is important, as is the time children spend learning from interactions with others. At school, students benefit from the supervision of qualified professionals and a structured schedule. For many students, school also means consistent access to meals.

Though remote learning is the best option in the current situation, it is not without its challenges. Here are some of the challenges associated with online learning:

  • Not all students have access to the same resources. Some
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The Impact of Coronavirus on Public Schools
As schools around the country close for two weeks or more, parents find themselves asking some tough questions. Read on to learn about the current and future impact of COVID-19 on students in public schools.

During the initial weeks of the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, authorities and lawmakers found themselves faced with some difficult decisions. When the threat to domestic health and public safety became clear, so did the necessity of not just encouraging but enforcing social distancing rules.

As more school districts send their students home, it leaves parents wondering not only what to do with their children during the break but how the break will affect progress.

Information about COVID-19 continues to develop while state and local legislators do their best to follow CDC and federal recommendations. The health and safety of the American public always comes first, but recent events bring into question the long-term effects of the measures taken to ensure public safety. Read on to learn more about the impact of COVID-19 school closures now and into next year.

School Closures for COVID-19

As the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic became clear, local and national government officials began to question whether social distancing recommendations were enough. In the last week, school districts all over the nation have announced temporary closures. The United States isn’t alone in these actions. According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), governments in 113 countries have closed educational institutions. Over 100 countries have implemented nationwide closures, impacting nearly an estimated 850 million children and youth.

How Will It Affect Testing and Progress?

Since the No Child Left Behind Act was implemented by the Bush administration in 2001, standardized testing has become a way of

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How Scaffolding Could Change the Way Your Child Learns
Every child learns differently and it’s a teacher’s job to meet students where they are and guide them through the learning process. Scaffolding is a teaching tool that helps students develop critical thinking skills and the ability to learn independently.

It is a teacher’s job to shape the minds of the nation’s youth, teaching them the concepts and skills they’ll need to become functional adults. Early childhood education is critical, and it can affect everything from a student’s future academic success to his mental and emotional health.

Every child learns differently and his educational success depends, in large part, on his teachers and their method of instruction. Children learn by listening, observing, exploring, and asking questions. The more a child understands the “what” and “why” of the lesson, the more motivated and engaged they’re going to be. Scaffolding is an instructional tool teachers use to develop critical thinking skills and other skills they need to work more independently.

Read on to learn more about what scaffolding is, how it differs from other teaching methods, and what benefits it has for student success.

What is Instructional Scaffolding?

In higher education, students are often left to their own devices to take a project from the assignment phase to completion. A college professor might give a classroom full of students a research article and ask them to write a detailed essay about the key topic. As the professor in this example, you might expect to receive mixed results. Some students are more than capable of completing a project with minimal instruction while others might struggle. In many ways, it comes down to the way the student was taught in the early years of his education.

Instructional scaffolding is a teaching method that breaks up a

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How to Help Your Child Succeed in and Out of School in 2020
Your child’s education is not just his teacher’s responsibility. As a parent, you have the ability to supplement your child’s education at home and to help him succeed in school. Read on to learn some tips to help your child make the most of his education in 2020.

Children learn from each and every experience they have. Before they set foot in school for the first time, you as the parent are their very first teacher. Education is not something that ends at a certain age but something your child should pursue throughout his life. If you want your child to become an informed individual, it’s time to start taking their education more seriously, both in and out of school.

If you develop in your child a hunger for knowledge, each and every day will become an opportunity to learn something new. In this article, we’ll explore some of the ways you can help your child maximize his education in 2020 by adapting to his learning style and supplementing his education at home.

Understanding Your Child’s Learning Style

In the early years of public school, there was an assumption that all children learned the same way or, at the very least, material was taught in a specific way. More recently, it has become evident that there are a number of different learning styles and every child is unique. By learning more about your child’s learning style, you can work with his teacher at school and with your child at home to help him maximize his education.

Here is an overview of the 7 different learning styles:

  1. Visual (Spatial) – This style learns best when they have an image to help them process the information or the opportunity to write out their thoughts.
  2. Aural (Auditory-Musical) – These learners respond primarily to sound. They
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Should Schools Screen for Childhood Trauma?
Childhood experiences shape who we become as adults, for good and bad. The new Surgeon General of California is pushing for childhood trauma screening in students in the hopes of resolving some of the issues that might later lead to the development of physical and mental health problems.

Childhood experiences shape who we become as adults, for good and bad. The new Surgeon General of California is pushing for childhood trauma screening in students in the hopes of resolving some of the issues that might later lead to the development of physical and mental health problems.

The new Surgeon General of California is working to implement an unprecedented plan to implement universal screenings for childhood trauma in children benefiting from the state’s Medicaid program.

Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, the first person to hold the newly developed role of Surgeon General of California, is a pediatrician known for studying the harmful effects of adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress. The goal of the program is to identify children living with untreated childhood trauma so they can get the help they need and prevent harmful health effects from developing later in life.

Though Harris has already taken several steps toward implementing this plan, there are those who question its cost. Read on to learn more about the program and to explore the subject of childhood trauma in greater depth.

What Constitutes Childhood Trauma?

According to the American Psychological Association (APA), a traumatic event is one that threatens injury, death, or the physical integrity of self or others and also causes horror, terror, or helplessness at the time it occurs. Examples may include sexual abuse, physical abuse, school or community violence, domestic violence, accidents, medical trauma, national or manmade disasters, and traumatic loss.

The results of a national survey on childhood experiences conducted

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Schools all over the country have closed their doors to slow the spread of COVID-19, forcing educators and parents to switch to online learning strategies. Read on to learn where to start with homeschooling and for helpful resources for learning at home.