An In-Depth Look at Common Core – What’s Working and What Isn’t?

Published   November 09, 2017 |
An In-Depth Look at Common Core – What’s Working and What Isn’t?
The Common Core State Standards Initiative, more commonly referred to simply as “Common Core”, was introduced to help American students graduate from high school better prepared for career and college. But what exactly are these "common core" standards, and are they working?

If you attended a public school in the United States, you have probably taken a standardized test at some point – probably a lot of them. Testing is one of the most common ways to evaluate the efficacy of an education program, though it may not always be the best way. One of the most well-known education programs that makes heavy use of testing is the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

The Common Core State Standards Initiative, more commonly referred to simply as “Common Core”, was introduced in the early 2000s, though many people still have a poor understanding of what it is and how it has affected the nation’s school systems. This system has been in place for half a decade and yet the jury is still out on whether it works or not.

Whether you have detailed knowledge of what’s going on in the nation’s education system or not, you are probably aware that the most recent presidential election has led to some big changes. Keep reading to learn about the history of common core, it’s future, and whether or not it really works.

A History of Common Core

According to the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), the Common Core State Standards Initiative is, “a set of high-quality academic standards in mathematics and English language arts/literacy,” also known as ELA. These standards exist to outline exactly what a student should know at the end of each grade in public educational systems. In a perfect world, these standards will

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Published   September 27, 2017 |
Tips for Easing Test Anxiety in Public School Students
Even the smartest of students can sometimes perform poorly on tests when they become anxious. Keep reading to learn how to ease test anxiety in public school students.

If your student attends public school, you are undoubtedly familiar with standardized testing. Standardized testing is designed to determine the effectiveness of a school’s curriculum and teaching staff as well as the degree to which students understand core concepts.

Many schools engage in standardized testing once a year or more in grades 3 through 8, focusing particularly on subjects like math, science, and language arts. Though these tests are partially designed to measure the effectiveness of a school program, they are also used to determine funding for public schools – this puts a lot of pressure on schools to ensure that their students perform well.

With so much riding on these tests, it is no wonder that many students develop test anxiety. Anxiety over testing can turn even the smartest, most intelligent student into a F student. But what is text anxiety and how do you deal with it? Keep reading to find out.

What is Test Anxiety?

According to the American Test Anxiety Association, test anxiety is a psychological condition in which students experience extreme distress before, during, and/or after a test or exam. This level of stress makes it difficult for the student to do their best work – it even causes some students to freeze up entirely and to forget everything they’ve learned. As many as 20% of school children have severe test anxiety and another 18% have a more moderate form of the condition. Understanding what test anxiety is and how it affects students is important for both

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Published   September 27, 2017 |
The Top 10 Study Tips for High School Students Preparing for College
Are you preparing to make the transition from high school to college? Many things are going to change for you in the coming years, so prepare for them academically by learning strong study skills now that you can apply during your college years.

Preparing for college can be nerve-wracking for a high school student, even if you’ve already been accepted by a school. During that final year of high school, it may be difficult to concentrate on academics, but you want to show your college that you aren’t slacking off just because you’ve already been accepted. It is always important to do your best.

As you prepare for college, not only should you be keeping up with your school work, but you should take some time to evaluate your study habits to see if you are properly prepared for college. In this article, you’ll receive the top ten study tips to get you ready for the transition into college.

How Much Studying Do College Students Do?

According to a national study, the average full-time college student spends about 15 hours per week studying. Of course, the number of hours a student spends studying doesn’t necessarily correlate with their level of academic success. For example, students who studied an average of 20 hours per week or more were not always fully prepared for class, according to the results of a campus-wide student engagement survey. The amount of time students spend studying may also depend on their major and their class load. For example, senior engineering students reported 19 hours of study per week while students in the social sciences and business studied an average of 5 hours less.

What is the takeaway here? While spending more time studying isn’t necessarily a guarantee of academic success, improving

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Updated   September 19, 2017 |
Gap Year: Points to Consider and How to Do It Right
Though many students move straight into college after high school, there is some benefit to taking a "gap year". Keep reading to learn what a gap year is and how it might benefit you.

Every year, millions of high school students graduate and move on to attend college or university. So many students follow this path that it has almost become an expectation for high schoolers to move immediately on to college after graduation. Of those millions upon millions of high school graduates, however, there are some who don’t follow tradition – some who take a year off between high school and college. This is called a gap year.

What exactly is a gap year and what are the potential benefits? In this article, you’ll receive an overview of what a gap year is as well as the associated pros and cons. You’ll also receive tips for making the most of your gap year, should you choose to take one.

What is a Gap Year?

Though many high school graduates move immediately in to college in the fall after they graduate, there are also many students who do not. The term “gap year” refers to the year off some students take between graduating high school and attending college. There are many reasons why a student might take a gap year. For many, a gap year is time to work and to save money to pay for tuition, lodging, and supplies while attending college. For others, it is something unexpected – an unplanned setback caused by an injury or major life event.

Gap years first became a standard practice in the United Kingdom during the 1970s as a means for students to gain practical and professional experience

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Published   August 02, 2017 |
A Quick Guide to U.S. Public and Private School Options
When it comes to public school, you may think that one school is like any other but you would be wrong. There are more than a dozen different types of public school - keep reading to learn more.

School is school – or so many parents think. What you may not realize, however, is that there are many different types of schools, even within the category of public schools. The school you send your child to will largely depend on where you live and what options are available but, if you have multiple options to choose from, it is important to learn what you can about each one before making your choice. The school that is right for one child may not be right for another, so consider your options carefully.

Not only is public school very different from private school, but there are over a dozen different types of schools (both public and private) scattered across the country. In this article, you’ll receive a brief overview of each of these school options so, if the choice becomes yours to make, you’ll be fully equipped to make an informed decision. Keep reading to learn the basics about different schooling options in the United States.

How is Public School Different from Private School?

The main difference between private and public school is the source of funding. Public schools are funded by local, state, or federal government while private schools are generally funded through tuition paid by the students. Because public schools receive federal funds, they must also follow federal guidelines and that sometimes limits what public schools are able to teach. Private schools are not subject to the same standards so they have more freedom in developing their curriculum. Licensing requirements

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