Parenting and Learning Issues

Each child learns differently. Here we offer resources on learning styles and the classroom models that support them, expert advice on how to improve learning, and tips on parental involvement.

View the most popular articles in Parenting and Learning Issues:

The Current State of Special Education in the U.S.

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The Current State of Special Education in the U.S.
The COVID-19 pandemic has turned the world on its head. The effects of the global pandemic will be felt for years to come, though maybe more so in certain populations. Here’s what you need to know about the current state of special education in the United States.

The term “special” is typically used to describe something that is better or greater than the average. In terms of education, however, the term is often used to describe students who are different or differently abled. Special education focuses on helping children with disabilities learn and, just as every student is different, so are the various approaches to special education.

Parents and teachers have always had their work cut out for them when it comes to educating and caring for special needs students, but the COVID-19 pandemic has created new challenges that may last for years to come. In this article, we’ll discuss the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on special education and provide useful information for both parents and teachers.

What is Special Education?

The term “special education” generally refers to a set of services provided to students who have unique learning needs. In terms of federal law, according to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), however, special education is defined as: “Specially designed instruction, at no cost to parents, to meet the unique needs of a child with a disability.”

In order to qualify for special education services, students must have an identified disability that affects their ability to learn. Eligible disabilities may include the following:

  • Intellectual disabilities
  • Speech or language impairment
  • Hearing impairment
  • Visual impairment
  • Serious emotional disturbance
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Orthopedic impairments
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Developmental delay
  • Specific learning disabilities

 Federal law requires schools to provide an appropriate education for all of their students with disabilities, regardless their disability or its severity. It also requires that six

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Managing Stress and Moving Forward from the Pandemic

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Managing Stress and Moving Forward from the Pandemic
As more schools return to in-person learning, teachers and parents find themselves dealing with the trauma and stress created by the pandemic.

After a long and difficult year, there is finally a light at the end of the tunnel. With over 60% of the U.S. population having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, things are looking up. COVID restrictions are being lifted, businesses are reopening, and children are returning to school. Though we have much to be thankful for, the scars left behind by a dark and challenging year won’t soon fade.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the state of the American public education system in deep and sometimes disturbing ways. Existing disparities between affluent children and low-income students have grown and it may take years of hard work and massive change to overcome them. What many educators are focusing on now as the world starts to return to normal isn’t catching students up on lost education in core subjects like math and science – it’s helping them cope with the stress of a year-long pandemic.

Millions of children around the globe have suffered from a year of isolation from friends and sporadic education. In this article, we’ll explore the subject of pandemic-related stress and provide helpful tips for parents and educators to support their children in the upcoming school year.

Traumatic Stress Caused by the COVID-19 Pandemic

Adam D. Brown, PsyD, a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU Longone discusses the notion of traumatic stress in children and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected millions of children in some very negative ways. A

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A Parent’s Guide for the Upcoming School Year

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A Parent’s Guide for the Upcoming School Year
As the nation works to recover from COVID-19, parents wonder what the fall of 2020 holds in terms of the upcoming school year. Read on to learn some tips for preparing for potential challenges and to see the answers to some of the biggest questions being asked by parents of school-age children.

The coronavirus pandemic has made its way around the world, changing the lives of millions all in the span of a few months. In the United States, many state governors issued stay-at-home orders that not only closed nonessential businesses and limited travel, but closed schools as well. Parents and teachers alike were forced to suddenly navigate the challenges of remote learning, some with more success than others. As things start to get back to “normal” in many states, parents are left wondering what the upcoming school year will look like and how they should prepare.

In this article, we’ll explore the subject of the upcoming 2020-21 school year and what it might look like. We’ll talk about the pros and cons of homeschooling as well and provide some tips for protecting your children if you choose to send them back to school.

Will Schools Be Open in the Fall?

Most Americans expect schools to reopen in the fall, but even if they do your child may not be returning to the same school they left in March. In a USA Today poll, 1 in 5 teachers revealed that they are unlikely to return to the classroom if their school reopens in the fall.

It’s no secret that the coronavirus pandemic upended our way of life, but even as many states begin to reopen we may be feeling the effects well into the next year. When it comes to the upcoming 2020-21 school year, there are no clear answers yet. The details

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What Public School Students Should Expect After COVID-19

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What Public School Students Should Expect After COVID-19
In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the financial impact of COVID-19 on public schools and what to expect in the future. We’ll talk about the effects of budget cuts and other challenges affecting the public school system for the remainder of this school year and into the next.

The coronavirus pandemic entered the United States with force, shutting down businesses and closing down schools in a matter of weeks. After months of partial or total lockdown, parts of the country are starting to reopen which leaves parents wondering what the future holds for their child’s education.

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the financial impact of COVID-19 on public schools and what to expect in the future. We’ll talk about the effects of budget cuts and other challenges affecting the public school system for the remainder of this school year and into the next.

Budget Cuts and Changes in State Revenue

The public school system is generally funded by the state through income, property, and sales taxes. Some public schools receive federal funding as well, or funding from outside sources.

In many cases, the school districts that need the most funding are not the ones that get it. In Pennsylvania, for example, high-poverty districts receive 33% less funding than wealthier districts. On the whole, only about 1 out of 5 states spend more money on their neediest schools, though that’s an improvement from 2008. In the wake of COVID-19, many public schools fear for their futures.

In Michigan, the Kalamazoo Public School’s budget is expected to decrease by 10% to 25% in the coming school year. A 25% cut in funding amounts to roughly $27 million. According to KPS Interim Superintendent Gary Start, it’s the worst state cut he’s ever seen. The cut could result in

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Tips to Maintain Your Child’s Education During School Closures

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Tips to Maintain Your Child’s Education During School Closures
Schools all over the country have closed their doors to slow the spread of COVID-19, forcing educators and parents to switch to online learning strategies. Read on to learn where to start with homeschooling and for helpful resources for learning at home.

In early March, the spread of COVID-19 became an issue lawmakers and educators could no longer ignore. The difficult decision was made in many states to close the doors of public and private schools, moving children to online learning from home. In the hopes that social distancing will slow the spread of the virus, families find themselves dealing with the challenges of working and schooling from home.

In this article, we’ll explore the challenges associated with online learning and the impact of widespread school closures. We’ll also talk about how to establish a homeschooling routine and provide some useful resources for online learning and educational ideas for children and families.

Challenges Associated with Online Learning

As schools all over the country closed their doors, a wave of panic spread through the community. Though many schools announced an initial 2-week closure, others offered no end date.

Not only have these closures resulted in an interruption of education, but they also have a negative impact on other aspects of a child’s life. The stability that comes from a daily school schedule is important, as is the time children spend learning from interactions with others. At school, students benefit from the supervision of qualified professionals and a structured schedule. For many students, school also means consistent access to meals.

Though remote learning is the best option in the current situation, it is not without its challenges. Here are some of the challenges associated with online learning:

  • Not all students have access to the same resources. Some
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Parenting and Learning Issues

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BULLYING
An overview of bullying in schools, laws to protect students, and the impact on education. This section provides great tips on protecting your child from being bullied or becoming a bully. Learn about the latest anti-bullying laws and see how cyber-bullying effects your child’s school performance.
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TYPES OF LEARNING
What type of learner is your child? Be in the know about different types of learning and which classrooms are best suited for each type. What is project-based learning? Cooperative Learning? Would your child benefit from a blended learning experience? Explore these teaching techniques and learn how they could improve your child’s performance.
Cooperative Learning
Cooperative Learning
The Current State of Special Education in the U.S.
The Current State of Special Education in the U.S.
Parents’ Guide to Special Education
Parents’ Guide to Special Education
HIGH SCHOOL ISSUES
Learn more about issues specific to high school students. Get an overview of high school graduation rates, college readiness, career choice and social issues impacting teenagers in public schools.
Pros and Cons of Sports Competition at the High School Level
Pros and Cons of Sports Competition at the High School Level
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What is the Impact of High School Graduation Rates?
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