Parenting and Learning Issues

Each child learns differently. Here we offer resources on learning styles and the classroom models that support them, expert advice on how to improve learning, and tips on parental involvement.
View the most popular articles in Parenting and Learning Issues:
Published January 09, 2017 |
What You Need to Know About Behavioral Intervention Plans
Children are going to act out - that is a fact of life. But when does a minor behavioral problem turn into a major issue? Keep reading to learn more about behavior intervention plans and how they might be able to help your child curb problem behaviors in school and at home.

You have undoubtedly heard the saying, “Kids will be kids”. This saying is based on the reality that sometimes children exhibit bad behaviors and it doesn’t necessarily mean that they are bad kids. But some children take this saying to an entirely different level – their behavioral problems become so bad that they are becoming disruptive in school, unresponsive in social situations, or even dangerous to other kids. If your child is exhibiting problem behaviors at school, you may want to talk to his teacher about creating a behavioral intervention plan.

What is a Behavior Intervention Plan?

A behavior intervention plan (BIP) is simply a plan that is designed to reward and reinforce positive behaviors. Behavior intervention plans look different in every instance because they are customized to a specific student and toward specific behaviors. Some of the problem behaviors that a BIP can be used to address may include the following:

  • Inappropriate language at school
  • Being disruptive in class
  • Aggressive behavior toward students and/or teachers
  • Becoming withdrawn or unresponsive
  • Refusal to do classwork and/or homework

There are several important steps that must be taken in order to develop a behavior intervention plan. For one thing, you need to identify the target behavior(s) that you want to address. Does your child throw things in the classroom? Does he refuse to remain quiet while the teacher is speaking? Does he refuse to do any of his homework or classwork? Once you’ve identified the problem behavior you want to address, you then need to determine what your child gains

. . .read more
Updated January 09, 2017 |
Beneficial Services for Physically Disabled Students in Schools
Every student has his own unique learning style but children with disabilities experience some unique struggles in school. Keep reading to learn about the rights of disabled students and the services for which they might qualify.

Things like ramps and automatic doors are basic services that can be very helpful for physically disabled students in school and in the world in general. But many physically disabled children find that they experience a great many challenges in school – challenges that many schools are simply not equipped to deal with. If you are the parent of a disabled child, take the time to learn about your child’s rights and about the services that exist for children like yours. Once you are equipped with this information, you can take it to the school board and fight for your child’s rights.

Laws Protecting Students with Disabilities

If you have a child with a physical disability, you understand that he experiences challenges each and every day. Many of these challenges are directly related to his disability, but there is also the issue of red tape – students with unique needs often get lost in the confusion when it comes to federal and state legislation. If you want to make sure that your child gets the services he needs to excel in school, you should start by learning about his rights – here is a summary of several important laws that protect students with disabilities:

  • The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) – This act requires that every educational institution (other than those operated by religious organizations) meet the needs of students with disabilities.
  • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973) – This is a civil rights statute which helps to protect students with disabilities
. . .read more
Published December 06, 2016 |
How Important Are Extra-Curricular Activities for College Applications?
It is never too early to start prepping for college by engaging in some extra-curricular activities that will help you to show a college admissions team who you are and what you believe in.

Every high school student in the country knows the word “extra-curricular” – it is a word that strikes fear into the heart of many. While extra-curricular activities may seem like a fun way to kill some time after school, for many students they are much more than that. They are a gold star on a college application – something that has real implications for the state of their future. But just how important are extra-curricular activities for your college application and are some better than others?

What Kind of Extra-Curricular Activities Are There?

When it comes to extra-curricular activities, the options are endless – but what really counts as an extra-curricular? Technically, it is an unpaid activity that doesn’t pertain to ordinary school classes. The activity itself may occur either in or out of school, though elective classes don’t count. For example, theater class is an elective because it takes place during school hours and it is an actual class – theater club is an extra-curricular if it takes place outside school hours and it isn’t technically a class. Volunteer work can also qualify as an extra-curricular activity. Here are some examples of extra-curricular activities you might consider joining:

  • Special interest clubs (clubs for like-minded students, often focused around a particular subject, activity, or interest)
  • School service clubs (clubs where students engage in projects to improve the school)
  • Scholarship clubs (clubs that exist primarily for prestige, though they may also offer scholarship awards)
  • Community volunteering clubs (clubs where students engage in projects to give back
. . .read more
Published October 10, 2016 |
Simple Tips for Boosting Your Child’s Testing Performance
Poor testing performance is not always an indication of low intelligence. If your child struggles with testing, take the time to identify his individual challenges then work with his teacher to practice and improve his skills.

When you ask your child about what he learned in school, he can probably tell you what subject he studied and rattle off some relevant facts. But when he brings home a test on the subject, you don’t see an “A” marked in red at the top of the page. Many parents do not realize that testing is not necessarily an accurate measure of your child’s intelligence, or even of his ability to understand certain subject matter. Testing is a skill and some children simply struggle more than others.

If your child seems perfectly intelligent and hardworking but still struggles when it comes to testing, you shouldn’t just brush it off. Testing is an important part of most school curriculums so it will benefit your child to take action sooner than later if he struggles with testing. Keep reading to learn more about why your child might be struggling and what you can do to help him.

Does Your Child Struggle with Testing in School?

Your child may be bright, or even gifted but he could still be struggling in school – especially when it comes to testing. It is very common for intelligent students to test poorly but, unfortunately, they are evaluated more on their test results than on their actual intelligence. The truth of the matter is that some children are simply better at testing than others – it is not always an accurate measure of intelligence or of the student’s understanding of the material. But what factors influence your

. . .read more
Updated November 09, 2016 |
Tips for Getting Your Autistic Child Ready for School
Starting school can be a scary and overwhelming situation for any child, but children with autism experience unique challenges. Keep reading to learn what those challenges may be and to receive some tips for dealing with them appropriately.

Autism is by no means a rare condition, though there is still a great deal of research that needs to be completed in order to truly understand the cause of this condition and the best way to treat it. If you have a child who suffers from autism, just getting through the day can be wrought with challenges. The thought of sending your autistic child to school – to an environment that could be scary and overwhelming for your child – may cause you to panic. With education and preparation, however, you can get your autistic child ready for school.

In this article you will learn some background information about autism to help you understand the unique challenges your child may face in school. You will also receive some detailed tips to help prepare yourself and your child to make the transition into school as smooth as possible. The more prepared you are, and the more prepared your child is, the better he will be able to transition into a school setting.

Understanding the Basics of Autism

Autism spectrum disorder, more commonly known as autism, is actually a general term for a group of complex disorders affecting brain development. Autism affects the child’s social interactions as well as his verbal and nonverbal communication skills and repetitive behaviors. Every child with autism is unique, though in general autism seems to be rooted in early brain development. Signs of autism tend to manifest between the ages of 2 and 3 years, though they can

. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  Next>>
Recent Articles
January 09, 2017
Children are going to act out - that is a fact of life. But when does a minor behavioral problem turn into a major issue? Keep reading to learn more about behavior intervention plans and how they might be able to help your child curb problem behaviors in school and at home.
January 09, 2017
Every student has his own unique learning style but children with disabilities experience some unique struggles in school. Keep reading to learn about the rights of disabled students and the services for which they might qualify.
January 06, 2017
School choice is one of the most controversial topics in education today, but what are the benefits and disadvantages it really brings to children? Learn more about school choice and what it truly means to your children.
Parenting and Learning Issues

Improving Learning

A comprehensive look at the latest trends, expert advice and recent studies into improving student learning. Explore the latest studies into links between student performance, sleep and music. See why schools are opting for later start times and year round schedules.

Parental Involvement from K-12

Learn how direct involvement in your child’s education can impact school performance. Get expert advice on how to get involved, learn why and when you need to talk to a teacher and ways to make changes on campus.

Bullying

An overview of bullying in schools, laws to protect students, and the impact on education. This section provides great tips on protecting your child from being bullied or becoming a bully. Learn about the latest anti-bullying laws and see how cyber-bullying effects your child’s school performance.

Types of Learning

What type of learner is your child? Be in the know about different types of learning and which classrooms are best suited for each type. What is project-based learning? Cooperative Learning? Would your child benefit from a blended learning experience? Explore these teaching techniques and learn how they could improve your child’s performance.

Kindergarten and Elementary Issues

Weigh the pros and cons of preschool, full day kindergarten and other issues affecting our youngest learners. Learn what can be done to help your child prepare to enter school, boost confidence, and encourage reading at the grade school level.

High School Issues

Learn more about issues specific to high school students. Get an overview of high school graduation rates, college readiness, career choice and social issues impacting teenagers in public schools.