Parental Involvement from K-12

Learn how direct involvement in your child’s education can impact school performance. Get expert advice on how to get involved, learn why and when you need to talk to a teacher and ways to make changes on campus.

View the most popular articles in Parental Involvement from K-12:

Banishing the Phone-based Childhood

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Banishing the Phone-based Childhood
The article advocates for a dramatic cultural shift - delaying kids' smartphone ownership until high school and social media access until 16, promoting more free play, and fostering a healthier, screen-free childhood through collective action.
iStockPhotos/golubovy

My late wife had a "brick," as those first Motorola cellphones were affectionately nicknamed. Back in the 90s, there were very few cell phones worldwide. Those early cell phones were bulky, expensive, and used primarily by business people. At that time, the pager was the only affordable signaling technology available to consumers. I remember keeping a pager in my belt when I ran with the local volunteer fire department. It wasn't until the 2000s that cell phones became affordable and widely available. The computing power of current smartphones is mind-boggling. That power, universal availability, affordability, and connectivity partnered with social media in all its forms have unleashed a phenomenon known as the phone-based childhood.

So, let's take a look at this phenomenon and its ramifications.

A professor from New York University says our society’snew phone-based childhoodis making young people sick and blocking their progress toward success during adulthood. He says weneed a dramatic cultural correction, and we need it now.Source: Niklaus Children's Hospital

After smartphones replaced flip phones, young people had the Internet in their pockets. They could use their phones anywhere, anytime. And that is the root of the problem: Young people have become addicted to their phones. Social interaction, reading, and playing outside are the 1990s and 2000s artifacts.

Growing up, we went outside to play in good weather. We played board games or worked jigsaw puzzles when the weather was inclement. We also had

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Preparing for a Successful 'Back to School'

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Preparing for a Successful 'Back to School'
A one-stop guide for parents navigating the 'back to school' season, providing practical and effective strategies tailored to every grade level - from pre-K to high school.

The start of a new school year can bring a mix of emotions for parents and children - from excitement and anticipation to anxiety and fear of the unknown. It's also a time when parents have to buy school supplies, clothes, uniforms, smart devices, and more. This article, however, will focus on the transition from being away from school to resuming the structured routine that is the essence of a public school education.

With some preparation, navigating this transition smoothly and setting your child up for success in their new grade is possible. Here's how to tackle the 'back to school' season, regardless of your child's grade level or family's circumstances.

With fears and potential adaptations still ahead for parents and children, return to school is always a time when parents and teachers revisit what is important for children and how to best support their positive development. Marilyn Price-Mitchell

PK-Kindergarten

Building a Routine

For many children, starting pre-K or kindergarten is their first taste of a structured daily routine. Establishing and practicing routines - like a consistent bedtime and a morning routine that includes getting dressed, brushing teeth, and eating breakfast - can help your child adjust more easily to the school day. Creating a visual schedule or using alarms and reminders can be valuable in maintaining consistency for families with single parents or busy schedules.

Reading Readiness

Strengthening pre-literacy skills can set the foundation for academic success. Simple activities like reading to your child daily, practicing

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Prevent Suicide

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Prevent Suicide
988 is the suicide and crisis lifeline. Parents, teachers, and students can help prevent suicide once they know the warning signs.

The nation got a new Suicide Hotline on July 16, 2022. All somebody has to do is dial 988 to speak with a trained counselor. 24/7

988 has been designated as the new three-digit dialing code that will route callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (now known as the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline), and is now active across the United States.

When people call, text, or chat 988, they will be connected to trained counselors that are part of the existing Lifeline network. These trained counselors will listen, understand how their problems are affecting them, provide support, and connect them to resources if necessary. Source: 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

Before we discuss suicide in more detail, please print out the logo above and pin it to your kitchen noticeboard. Then, tell your children what 988 is and what it is used for, so they can help somebody in need the same way they do by knowing how and when to call 911.

This video explains how the 988 suicide and crisis lifeline works.

Suicide: The Subject Nobody Wants To Talk About

Suicide knows no age limits. It is shocking and tragic, no matter how or when it occurs. It scatters guilt widely as the friends and loved ones of the deceased wonder what they could have done to prevent somebody from taking her life. What subtle warning signs

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Managing Stress and Moving Forward from the Pandemic

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Managing Stress and Moving Forward from the Pandemic
As more schools return to in-person learning, teachers and parents find themselves dealing with the trauma and stress created by the pandemic.

After a long and difficult year, there is finally a light at the end of the tunnel. With over 60% of the U.S. population having received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, things are looking up. COVID restrictions are being lifted, businesses are reopening, and children are returning to school. Though we have much to be thankful for, the scars left behind by a dark and challenging year won’t soon fade.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the state of the American public education system in deep and sometimes disturbing ways. Existing disparities between affluent children and low-income students have grown and it may take years of hard work and massive change to overcome them. What many educators are focusing on now as the world starts to return to normal isn’t catching students up on lost education in core subjects like math and science – it’s helping them cope with the stress of a year-long pandemic.

Millions of children around the globe have suffered from a year of isolation from friends and sporadic education. In this article, we’ll explore the subject of pandemic-related stress and provide helpful tips for parents and educators to support their children in the upcoming school year.

Traumatic Stress Caused by the COVID-19 Pandemic

Adam D. Brown, PsyD, a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU Longone discusses the notion of traumatic stress in children and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected millions of children

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A Parent’s Guide for the Upcoming School Year

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A Parent’s Guide for the Upcoming School Year
As the nation works to recover from COVID-19, parents wonder what the fall of 2020 holds in terms of the upcoming school year. Read on to learn some tips for preparing for potential challenges and to see the answers to some of the biggest questions being asked by parents of school-age children.

The coronavirus pandemic has made its way around the world, changing the lives of millions all in the span of a few months. In the United States, many state governors issued stay-at-home orders that not only closed nonessential businesses and limited travel, but closed schools as well. Parents and teachers alike were forced to suddenly navigate the challenges of remote learning, some with more success than others. As things start to get back to “normal” in many states, parents are left wondering what the upcoming school year will look like and how they should prepare.

In this article, we’ll explore the subject of the upcoming 2020-21 school year and what it might look like. We’ll talk about the pros and cons of homeschooling as well and provide some tips for protecting your children if you choose to send them back to school.

Will Schools Be Open in the Fall?

Most Americans expect schools to reopen in the fall, but even if they do your child may not be returning to the same school they left in March. In a USA Today poll, 1 in 5 teachers revealed that they are unlikely to return to the classroom if their school reopens in the fall.

It’s no secret that the coronavirus pandemic upended our way of life, but even as many states begin to reopen we may be feeling the effects well into the next year. When it comes to the upcoming 2020-21 school year, there are

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