Connecticut Charter Public Schools

All Schools
(17)
High Schools
(7)
Middle Schools
(6)
Elementary
(10)
Pre-K
(4)
There are 17 charter public schools in Connecticut serving 6,098 students.
Learn more about how charter schools work.
Minority enrollment is 90% of the student body (majority Black), which is more than the Connecticut state average of 39%.
The student:teacher ratio of 13:1 is equal to the state average of 13:1.

Connecticut Charter Public Schools

  • School Location Students Grades
  • BridgeportAchievement First Bridgeport Academy
    655 Stillman St
    BridgeportCT06608
    (203)338-0593
    543 students | Gr. KG-9
  • HartfordAchievement First Hartford Academy Inc.
    305 Greenfield St
    HartfordCT06112
    (860)695-5280
    762 students | Gr. KG-8
  • New HavenAmistad Academy
    130 Edgewood Ave
    New HavenCT06511
    (203)772-7000
    857 students | Gr. KG-12
  • New Haven
    Common Ground High School
    358 Springside Ave
    New HavenCT06515
    (203)389-0823
    165 students | Gr. 9-12
  • New Haven
    Elm City College Preparatory School
    240 Green St
    New HavenCT06513
    (203)498-0702
    600 students | Gr. KG-12
  • WinstedExplorations High School
    71 Spencer St
    WinstedCT06098
    (860)738-9070
    74 students | Gr. 9-12
  • HamdenHighville Charter School
    130 Leederhill Dr
    HamdenCT06517
    (203)287-0528
    337 students | Gr. PK-8
  • NorwichIntegrated Day Charter School
    68 Thermos Rd
    NorwichCT06360
    (860)892-1900
    330 students | Gr. PK-8
  • New LondonInterdistrict School For Arts And Communication
    190 Governor Winthrop Boulev
    New LondonCT06320
    (860)447-1003
    191 students | Gr. 6-8
  • HartfordJumoke Academy
    250 Blue Hills Ave
    HartfordCT06112
    (860)575-0575
    488 students | Gr. PK-8
  • BridgeportNew Beginnings Inc. Family Academy
    510 Barnum Ave
    BridgeportCT06608
    (203)336-9852
    361 students | Gr. KG-8
  • ManchesterOdyssey Community School
    579 West Middle Turnpike
    ManchesterCT06040
    (860)645-1234
    314 students | Gr. KG-8
  • BridgeportPark City Prep Charter School
    510 Barnum Ave
    BridgeportCT06608
    (203)953-3766
    257 students | Gr. 6-8
  • NorwalkSide By Side Charter School
    10 Chestnut St
    NorwalkCT06854
    (203)857-0306
    232 students | Gr. PK-8
  • StamfordStamford Academy
    229 North St
    StamfordCT06092
    (203)324-6300
    141 students | Gr. 9-12
  • BridgeportThe Bridge Academy
    410 Kossuth St
    BridgeportCT06608
    (203)336-9999
    276 students | Gr. 7-12
  • StamfordTrailblazers Academy
    Park Square St
    StamfordCT06907
    (203)977-5690
    170 students | Gr. 6-8

State Statistics

About This State (CT) (CT) State Statistics Nationwide Statistics
Population (Approximate) 3,474,622 people 304,788,178 people
Age 25+ w/College Degree 35% 25%
Median Household Income $77,604 $46,250
Recent Public School Articles
Are the Three Rs Robbing our Children?
Are the Three Rs Robbing our Children?
For far too long the American public school system has failed to address “out-of-school” factors like poverty and their impact on what happens in the classroom. As the nation continues to become increasingly diverse, many schools are adopting comprehensive approaches to education that account for the unique needs of students so that each child is prepared for their future and not just for a year-end test.
States Fight to Teach “Ignorant” Science to Students
Wyoming recently became the first state to reject the Next Generation Science Standards because of concern regarding lessons that teach human-caused climate change. Several other states have also taken measures to reject the standards, which has some education officials concerned about the quality of instruction students in those states will receive.
School-to-Prison Pipeline Persists Despite Local, State and National Efforts
Inadequate funding and resources for schools, harsh zero-tolerance discipline policies, police presence in public schools, and de facto segregation continue to create school environments in which poor and minority students have little chance of succeeding. The result is a continuation of the school-to-prison pipeline that has been commonplace in the American education system for decades, despite federal, state and local efforts to curb the problem.