Types of Learning

What type of learner is your child? Be in the know about different types of learning and which classrooms are best suited for each type. What is project-based learning? Cooperative Learning? Would your child benefit from a blended learning experience? Explore these teaching techniques and learn how they could improve your child’s performance.
View the most popular articles in Types of Learning:
What is co-teaching?


Co-teaching is an inclusion education model in which students with special education needs are provided the opportunity to learn in a mainstream classroom with the additional support of a special education teacher who co-teaches with the general education teacher. This model has proven successful in many school districts for several reasons.





Benefits for students with special education requirements


First of all, the co-teaching model ensures that students with special needs have access to the general education curriculum. By law students with disabilities must be provided access to learning opportunities that do not restrict their ability to progress in a subject or grade-level. In a co-taught class, special education students have the opportunity to move from modified assignments to typical assignments as they develop skills and confidence. As a result, co-taught special education students are generally more likely to meet grade-level standards.


While they have access to the mainstream curriculum, co-taught students also continue to receive specialized instruction. Special education teachers within the mainstream classroom can coach students individually, or in small groups, providing them the additional coaching and guidance necessary for them to complete activities and assignments.


Differentiated instruction


In addition to in-class support for mainstream assignments, co-taught students also have the opportunity to grow within the curriculum through differentiated instruction. Since there are two teachers in the class, the same material can be taught in two or more different ways. The special education teacher can anticipate student needs and, in planning lessons with the mainstream teacher, prepare
. . .read more
If you have a child with special needs, you are no doubt familiar with many of the services and accommodations provided to them by their school. You may also have a clear understanding of some of the laws that guarantee your child the appropriate support services in an educational setting. You are likely also familiar with the time, energy and red tape required to obtain services for your child. It is a complicated process indeed, with many legal underpinnings guiding the development and administration of programs for special needs kids.
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
First passed in 1975 as the Education of Handicapped Children Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), as it stands today, is the result of revisions in 1990, 1997 and 2004. Prior to 1975, children with disabilities were either placed in segregated classrooms in public schools or denied access to public education altogether.
Today’s iteration of IDEA includes four parts, including Part B, which outlines the service requirements for children from 3-21 years of age, and Part C, which governs the administration of services to children from birth to 2 years of age. IDEA, among other things, establishes that families have a right to:  
  • A Free and Appropriate Public Education for school-aged children.
  • An Individualized Education Plan for public school students.
  • A consultation with a school professional to determine the level of a disabled child’s needs.
  • Access to early intervention services for infants and toddlers.
  • An Individualized Family Service Plan for infants and toddlers.
. . .read more
Project-based learning is a unique type of pedagogy that moves beyond the traditional “memorize and regurgitate information” approach that is commonly seen in classrooms today. Project-based learning brings relevancy and practical application to the lesson, by making students active participants, rather than mere bystanders. Although project-based learning is still used on a relatively limited basis today, there are a number of reasons why educators might want to consider incorporating this methodology into their classrooms.
A Definition of Project-Based Learning
According to the West Virginia Department of Education, project-based learning involves students coming together in groups or working individually to explore real-world problems. Through their explorations, students create presentations that sum up what they learned and their proposed solutions to those problems. Teachers in project-based learning classrooms serve as facilitators and guides, helping students find answers to questions without spoon feeding the answers directly to them.
The Edutopia website explains that project-based learning comes from the belief that students learn best by becoming active participants in the education process. The methodology involves the following:
       ·      Students using knowledge learned to tackle problems experienced in the real world
       ·      Students exercising more control over their learning environment
       ·      Students typically working in groups or pairs, although individual projects can also be used
       ·      Teachers serving as coaches to encourage student reflection and problem-solving skills
Project-based learning is similar to problem-based learning, which presents students with a real-world problem and allows them to explore possible solutions. However, in project-based learning, there is a
. . .read more
When a child begins to struggle academically, the problem may be out of a parent’s scope of expertise. This may be the time to consider a tutor to help a student over the rough patch.  How do you know which tutor will be able to offer the most help to your child?  Start by asking these 10 questions before determining which professional will meet your child’s specific needs best.
Which subject is causing the most difficulty?
Before considering a tutor for your child, it is important to identify the specific areas in which your child needs help. This typically involves a conference with the teacher to determine which subjects are causing your child the most difficulty. Reading should be evaluated first, since reading troubles can cross into other subjects as well. Math and science are also common subjects requiring tutoring, according to Education News Colorado.
Does my child face organizational or academic challenges?
For some students, school issues are pointedly academic in nature, such as the child who is struggling with reading or sums. However, if you notice your child is performing well on tests, but showing more difficulty with homework, the cause of the problem could be more organizational than academic. Does your child have trouble keeping track of assignments? Does he complete assignments but fail to turn them in? Organizational issues may require a different type of tutoring than academic problems.
Is the tutor trained to work with children with learning disabilities?
If your child has a
. . .read more
A wealth of resources and web site links for all subject areas for kindergarten teachers.
  • Shape Book Patterns - A to Z Shape Book Patterns with and without lines
  • Literacy Sites available en francais and English - Literacy Center offers a fun and interactive site where early learners can explore numbers, letters, colours and shapes in English and French.
  • CENTER SIGNS - A wonderful site. Every sign you can think of ! Great for labeling ~
  • Internet4classrooms - Online Interactive Web Sites ~ Literacy and Math ~ For use as Independent Skill Activities during Center Time
  • More Sequenced Lesson Plans from Utah - Looking for ideas and formal lesson plans and activites for your core curriculum then do check this one out!
  • BACKFLIP Kinder Collection
  • Carls Corner - 'Where kids play and teachers learn' Literacy
  • FRENCH sites - FSL Activities with M. Renaud
  • KINDERGARTEN ~ From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Includes Kindergarten systems of various countries, functions of Kindergarten, what should kindergarten activities include, readings and external links
  • Kindergarten Rubrics - In writing and science..can be modified and adapted
  • Kindergarten Web Site...ings of the Day - Check in here frequently for
. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3  Next>>
Recent Articles
Secrets of Spelling Bee Champs
Secrets of Spelling Bee Champs
An overview of the top tips and strategies used by winners of regional and national spelling bees.
Co-teaching Offers New Opportunities for Students with Special Needs
Although there are some drawbacks, co-teaching is an effective way to help special education students succeed in mainstream classrooms.
Life Beyond High School: The Innovative Frontier
Exploring post graduation options for high school students.
Parenting and Learning Issues

Types of Learning