Best Eagleville Public Schools (2022)

For the 2022 school year, there are 2 public schools serving 226 students in Eagleville, MO. Eagleville has one of the highest concentrations of top ranked public schools in Missouri.
The top ranked public schools in Eagleville, MO are North Harrison High School and North Harrison Elementary School. Overall testing rank is based on a school's combined math and reading proficiency test score ranking.
Eagleville, MO public schools have an average math proficiency score of 38% (versus the Missouri public school average of 42%), and reading proficiency score of 51% (versus the 49% statewide average). Schools in Eagleville have an average ranking of 6/10, which is in the top 50% of Missouri public schools.
Minority enrollment is 2% of the student body (majority Hispanic and Asian), which is less than the Missouri public school average of 29% (majority Black).

Best Eagleville, MO Public Schools (2022)

School (Math and Reading Proficiency)
Location
Grades
Students
Rank: #11.
North Harrison High School
Math: 30-39% | Reading: 50-59%
Rank:
6/
10
Top 50%
12023 Fir St
Eagleville, MO 64442
(660) 867-5221
Grades: 7-12
| 106 students
Rank: #22.
North Harrison Elementary School
Math: 40-44% | Reading: 45-49%
Rank:
6/
10
Top 50%
12023 Fir St
Eagleville, MO 64442
(660) 867-5214
Grades: PK-6
| 120 students

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