Top 10 Best Clinton Public High Schools (2021)

All
(9)
All
(9)
 
High
(2)
High
(2)
 
Middle
(2)
Middle
(2)
 
Elementary
(7)
Elementary
(7)
 
Pre-K
(2)
Pre-K
(2)
 
Private
(2)
Private
(2)
 
For the 2021 school year, there are 2 public high schools serving 1,075 students in Clinton, NC. The top ranked public high schools in Clinton, NC are Sampson Early College High School and Clinton High School. Overall testing rank is based on a school's combined math and reading proficiency test score ranking.
Clinton, NC public high schools have an average math proficiency score of 6% (versus the North Carolina public high school average of 15%), and reading proficiency score of 50% (versus the 51% statewide average). High schools in Clinton have an average ranking of 7/10, which is in the top 50% of North Carolina public high schools.
Clinton, NC public high school have a Graduation Rate of 85%, which is less than the North Carolina average of 86%.
The school with highest graduation rate is Sampson Early College High School, with ≥90% graduation rate. Read more about public school graduation rate statistics in North Carolina or national school graduation rate statistics.
Minority enrollment is 70% of the student body (majority Black and Hispanic), which is more than the North Carolina public high school average of 49% (majority Black).

Top Clinton, NC Public High Schools (2021)

  • School (Math and Reading Proficiency) Location Grades Students
  • Rank: #11.
    Sampson Early College High School Math: ≤10% | Reading: 75-79%
    Rank
    7/
    10
    Top 50%
    1801 Sunset Ave
    Clinton, NC 28329
    (910) 592-8081

    Grades: 9-13 | 213 students
  • Rank: #22.
    Clinton High School Math: ≤5% | Reading: 42%
    Rank
    3/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    340 Indian Town Road
    Clinton, NC 28328
    (910) 592-2067

    Grades: 9-12 | 862 students
Recent Articles
While students are enjoying time off this summer, school district officials across the country are grappling with the issues associated with Common Core Standards, as well as plenty of opposition from parents and teachers.
As more schools return to in-person learning, teachers and parents find themselves dealing with the trauma and stress created by the pandemic.
After more than a year of remote learning, schools are finally returning to in-person instruction but how has the pandemic changed the face of public education and what will it look like moving forward?