93722 California Public Middle Schools

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For the 2021 school year, there are 4 public middle schools in 93722, California, serving 1,793 students.
Public middle schools in zipcode 93722 have an average math proficiency score of 29% (versus the California public middle school average of 37%), and reading proficiency score of 41% (versus the 48% statewide average). Middle schools in 93722, California have an average ranking of 5/10, which is in the bottom 50% of California public middle schools.
The top ranked public middle schools in 93722, California are Rio Vista Middle School, El Capitan Middle School and Central Unified Alternative/opportunity. Overall testing rank is based on a school's combined math and reading proficiency test score ranking.
Minority enrollment is 81% of the student body (majority Hispanic), which is more than the California public middle school average of 75% (majority Hispanic).
The student:teacher ratio of 24:1 is more than the California public middle school average of 23:1.

93722, CA Public Middle Schools (2021)

  • School (Math and Reading Proficiency) Location Grades Students
  • Rio Vista Middle School Math: 38% | Reading: 52%
    Rank
    7/
    10
    Top 50%
    6240 W. Palo Alto
    Fresno, CA 93722
    (559) 276-3185

    Grades: 7-8 | 863 students
  • El Capitan Middle School Math: 20% | Reading: 29%
    Rank
    2/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    4443 W. Weldon Ave.
    Fresno, CA 93722
    (559) 276-5270

    Grades: 7-8 | 712 students
  • Central Unified Alternative/opportunity Alternative School
    Math: ≤5% | Reading: 20-24%
    Rank
    1/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    2698 N. Brawley
    Fresno, CA 93722
    (559) 276-5230

    Grades: K-12 | 218 students
  • Crescent View South Charter Charter School
    4348 W. Shaw Ave.
    Fresno, CA 93722
    (559) 389-7270

    Grades: K-12 | n/a student
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