Top 10 Best 32254 Florida Public Schools (2021)

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For the 2021 school year, there are 11 public schools serving 5,542 students in 32254, FL.
The top ranked public schools in 32254, FL are James Weldon Johnson College Prepartory Middle School, Paxon School/advanced Studies and Pickett Elementary School. Overall testing rank is based on a school's combined math and reading proficiency test score ranking.
Public schools in zipcode 32254 have an average math proficiency score of 68% (versus the Florida public school average of 58%), and reading proficiency score of 62% (versus the 55% statewide average). Schools in 32254, FL have an average ranking of 8/10, which is in the top 30% of Florida public schools.
Minority enrollment is 76% of the student body (majority Black), which is more than the Florida public school average of 62% (majority Hispanic).

Top 32254, FL Public Schools (2021)

  • School (Math and Reading Proficiency) Location Grades Students
  • Rank: #11.
    James Weldon Johnson College Prepartory Middle School Magnet School
    Math: 90% | Reading: 84%
    Rank
    10/
    10
    Top 5%
    3276 Norman Thagard Blvd
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 693-7600

    Grades: 6-8 | 993 students
  • Rank: #22.
    Paxon School/advanced Studies Magnet School
    Math: 75% | Reading: 85%
    Rank
    10/
    10
    Top 10%
    3239 Norman E Thagard Blvd
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 693-7583

    Grades: 9-12 | 1,498 student
  • Rank: #33.
    Pickett Elementary School Math: 50-54% | Reading: 45-49%
    Rank
    5/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    6305 Old Kings Rd
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 693-7555

    Grades: PK-6 | 227 students
  • Rank: #44.
    Palm Avenue Excep. Student Center Special Education School
    Math: 65-69% | Reading: 20-29%
    Rank
    4/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    1301 W Palm Ave
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 693-7516

    Grades: 6-12 | 150 students
  • Rank: #55.
    Biltmore Elementary School Math: 55-59% | Reading: 35-39%
    Rank
    4/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    2101 W Palm Ave
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 693-7569

    Grades: PK-5 | 287 students
  • Rank: #66.
    Pinedale Elementary School Magnet School
    Math: 50-54% | Reading: 40-44%
    Rank
    4/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    4229 Edison Ave
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 381-7490

    Grades: PK-6 | 483 students
  • Rank: #77.
    Kipp Voice / Kipp Impact K-8 Charter School
    Math: 51% | Reading: 32%
    Rank
    3/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    1440 Mcduff Ave N
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 683-6643

    Grades: K-8 | 779 students
  • Rank: #88.
    Reynolds Lane Elementary School Math: 45-49% | Reading: 25-29%
    Rank
    2/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    840 Reynolds Ln
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 381-3960

    Grades: PK-5 | 344 students
  • Rank: #99.
    Hospital And Homebound Special Education School
    Math: ≤20% | Reading: 40-49%
    Rank
    2/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    4037 Blvd Ctr Dr
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 381-3840

    Grades: K-12 | 94 students
  • Rank: #1010.
    Annie R. Morgan Elementary School Math: 35-39% | Reading: 20-24%
    Rank
    2/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    964 Saint Clair St
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 381-3970

    Grades: PK-5 | 377 students
  • Rank: #1111.
    Kipp Jacksonville K-8 Charter School
    1440 Mcduff Ave N
    Jacksonville, FL 32254
    (904) 683-6643

    Grades: K-2 | 310 students
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