29625 South Carolina Public Schools

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  • For the 2020 school year, there are 6 top public schools in 29625, South Carolina, serving 4,477 students.
  • Public schools in zipcode 29625 have an average math proficiency score of 41% (versus South Carolina public school average of 44%), and reading proficiency score of 36% (versus 43% South Carolina statewide average). Their average school ranking is in the bottom 50% of public schools in South Carolina.
  • The school with the highest math and reading proficiency is Westside High School, with 58% math proficiency and 61% reading proficiency. Read more about public school math/reading proficiency statistics in South Carolina or national school math/reading proficiency statistics.
  • Minority enrollment is 53% of the student body (majority Black) , which is more than the South Carolina public school average of 49% (majority Black).
  • The student:teacher ratio of 15:1 is less than the South Carolina public school average of 16:1.

29625, SC Public Schools (2020)

  • School Location Grades Students
  • Anderson Centerville Elemenetary
    1529 Whitehall Road
    Anderson, SC 29625
    (864)260-5100

    Grades: K-5 | 693 students
  • Anderson Lakeside Middle School
    315 Pearman Dairy Road
    Anderson, SC 29625
    (864)260-5135

    Grades: 6-8 | 421 students
  • Anderson New Prospect Elementary School
    126 New Prospect Church Road
    Anderson, SC 29625
    (864)260-5195

    Grades: K-5 | 486 students
  • Anderson Robert Anderson Middle School
    2302 Dobbins Bridge Road
    Anderson, SC 29625
    (864)716-3890

    Grades: 6-8 | 671 students
  • Anderson Westside High School
    806 Pearman Dairy Road
    Anderson, SC 29625
    (864)260-5260

    Grades: 9-12 | 1695 students
  • Anderson Whitehall Elementary School
    702 Whitehall Road
    Anderson, SC 29625
    (864)260-5255

    Grades: PK-5 | 511 students
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