Top Kaysville Public Schools

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Top Kaysville, UT Public Schools (2021)

  • School (Math and Reading Proficiency) Location Grades Students
  • Endeavour School Math: 84% | Reading: 79%
    10/
    10
    Top 1%
    1870 S 25 W
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-0400

    Grades: K-6 | 920 students
  • Kay's Creek Elementary School Math: 69% | Reading: 74%
    10/
    10
    Top 5%
    2260 W Island Dr.
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-0050

    Grades: PK-6 | 667 students
  • Snow Horse School Math: 73% | Reading: 67%
    10/
    10
    Top 5%
    1095 W Smith Lane
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-7350

    Grades: K-6 | 683 students
  • H C Burton School Math: 70% | Reading: 64%
    10/
    10
    Top 10%
    827 E 200 S
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-3150

    Grades: PK-6 | 776 students
  • Windridge School Math: 66% | Reading: 67%
    10/
    10
    Top 10%
    1300 S 700 E
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-3550

    Grades: PK-6 | 637 students
  • Kaysville School Math: 64% | Reading: 60%
    10/
    10
    Top 10%
    50 N 100 E
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-3400

    Grades: PK-6 | 713 students
  • Jefferson Academy Charter School
    Math: 62% | Reading: 61%
    9/
    10
    Top 20%
    1425 S Angel St
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 593-8200

    Grades: K-6 | 579 students
  • Centennial Junior High School Math: 65% | Reading: 57%
    9/
    10
    Top 20%
    740 S Sunset Dr
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-0100

    Grades: 7-9 | 1,530 student
  • Columbia School Math: 60% | Reading: 62%
    9/
    10
    Top 20%
    378 S 50 W
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-3350

    Grades: K-6 | 676 students
  • Morgan School Math: 60% | Reading: 59%
    9/
    10
    Top 20%
    1065 Thornfield Rd
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-3450

    Grades: PK-6 | 754 students
  • Kaysville Junior High School Math: 67% | Reading: 49%
    8/
    10
    Top 30%
    100 E 350 S
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-7200

    Grades: 7-9 | 958 students
  • Fairfield Junior High School Math: 61% | Reading: 49%
    8/
    10
    Top 30%
    951 N Fairfield Rd
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-7000

    Grades: 7-9 | 1,047 student
  • Davis High School Math: 60% | Reading: 43%
    7/
    10
    Top 50%
    325 S Main
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-8800

    Grades: 10-12 | 2,604 students
  • Utah Career Path High School Charter School
    Math: 40-49% | Reading: 50-59%
    6/
    10
    Top 50%
    550 East 300 South, Room 2037
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 593-2440

    Grades: 9-12 | 170 students
  • Creekside School Math: 49% | Reading: 47%
    6/
    10
    Top 50%
    275 W Mutton Hollow Rd
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-3650

    Grades: PK-6 | 760 students
  • Renaissance Academy Alternative School
    Math: ≤10% | Reading: 11-19%
    1/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    264 S 500 E
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-0350

    Grades: K-12 | 431 students
  • Family Enrichment Center Special Education School
    320 S 500 E
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-0650

    Grades: PK | 164 students
  • Leap Academy Charter School
    Temp: 940 Willowmere Dr.
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 971-3601

    Grades: n/a | n/a student
  • Mountain High School Alternative School
    490 S 500 E
    Kaysville, UT 84037
    (801) 402-0450

    Grades: 10-12 | 147 students
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