Top Pomona Public Schools

All
(4)
All
(4)
 
High
(2)
High
(2)
 
Middle
(2)
Middle
(2)
 
Elementary
(3)
Elementary
(3)
 
Pre-K
(1)
Pre-K
(1)
 
Charter
(1)
Charter
(1)
 
  • For the 2020 school year, there are 4 public schools in Pomona, KS, serving 521 students.
  • Pomona, KS public school have an average math proficiency score of 41% (versus the Kansas public school average of 34%), and reading proficiency score of 44% (versus the 38% statewide average). Schools in Pomona have an average ranking in the top 30% of Kansas public schools.
  • The top ranked public schools in Pomona, KS are Appanoose Elementary School, West Franklin High School and West Franklin Middle School. Overall school rank is based on a school's combined math and reading proficiency test score ranking.
  • Minority enrollment is 10% of the student body (majority Hispanic), which is less than the Kansas public school average of 36% (majority Hispanic).
  • The student:teacher ratio of 13:1 is less than the Kansas public school average of 14:1.

Top Pomona, KS Public Schools (2020)

  • School (Math/Reading Proficiency) Location
    Grades
    Students
  • Appanoose Elementary School Math: 35-39% | Reading: 55-59%
    Rank: Top 30%
    600 Shawnee Road
    Pomona, KS 66076
    (785)566-3386

    Grades: PK-5 | 188 students
  • West Franklin High School Math: 40-49% | Reading: 40-49%
    Rank: Top 50%
    511 East Franklin
    Pomona, KS 66076
    (785)566-3392

    Grades: 9-12 | 177 students
  • West Franklin Learning Center High - Charter Charter School
    511 E Franklin
    Pomona, KS 66076
    (785)746-5766

    Grades: 6-12 | 10 students
  • West Franklin Middle School Math: 40-44% | Reading: 35-39%
    Rank: Top 50%
    509 East 4th Street
    Pomona, KS 66076
    (785)566-3451

    Grades: 6-8 | 146 students
Recent Articles
Learn about the recent vote by the Indiana School Board to allow a state takeover of four Indiana schools beginning next school year.
We take a look at the various ways high school students can get a leg up on higher education while they are still in high school.
We take a look at a recent call by U.S. health officials to change public policies involving sports-related head trauma injuries, and how some states are already answering the call.