Top 10 Best Dale County Public Schools (2021)

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For the 2021 school year, there are 15 public schools serving 6,178 students in Dale County, AL. Dale County has one of the highest concentrations of top ranked public schools in Alabama.
The top ranked public schools in Dale County, AL are George W Long High School, Gw Long Elementary School and Newton Elementary School. Overall testing rank is based on a school's combined math and reading proficiency test score ranking.
Dale County, AL public schools have an average math proficiency score of 47% (versus the Alabama public school average of 47%), and reading proficiency score of 46% (versus the 46% statewide average). Schools in Dale County have an average ranking of 7/10, which is in the top 50% of Alabama public schools.
Minority enrollment is 40% of the student body (majority Black), which is less than the Alabama public school average of 45% (majority Black).

Top Dale County Public Schools (2021)

  • School (Math and Reading Proficiency) Location Grades Students
  • Rank: #11.
    George W Long High School Math: 82% | Reading: 56%
    Rank
    9/
    10
    Top 20%
    2565 Co Rd 60
    Skipperville, AL 36374
    (334) 774-2380

    Grades: 7-12 | 414 students
  • Rank: #22.
    Gw Long Elementary School Math: 69% | Reading: 59%
    Rank
    9/
    10
    Top 20%
    2567 Co Rd 60
    Skipperville, AL 36374
    (334) 774-0021

    Grades: K-6 | 483 students
  • Rank: #33.
    Newton Elementary School Math: 60-64% | Reading: 55-59%
    Rank
    9/
    10
    Top 20%
    523 South College St
    Newton, AL 36352
    (334) 445-5564

    Grades: K-6 | 253 students
  • Rank: #44.
    Ariton School Math: 66% | Reading: 55%
    Rank
    9/
    10
    Top 20%
    264 Creel Richardson Drive
    Ariton, AL 36311
    (334) 762-2371

    Grades: K-12 | 690 students
  • Rank: #55.
    Midland City Elementary School Math: 55-59% | Reading: 50-54%
    Rank
    8/
    10
    Top 30%
    48 Second Street
    Midland City, AL 36350
    (334) 983-4591

    Grades: K-4 | 412 students
  • Rank: #66.
    Dale County High School Math: 45-49% | Reading: 50-54%
    Rank
    7/
    10
    Top 50%
    11470 County Road 59
    Midland City, AL 36350
    (334) 983-3541

    Grades: 9-12 | 474 students
  • Rank: #77.
    Carroll High School Math: 45-49% | Reading: 35-39%
    Rank
    5/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    141 Eagle Way
    Ozark, AL 36360
    (334) 774-4915

    Grades: 9-12 | 696 students
  • Rank: #88.
    D A Smith Middle School Math: 39% | Reading: 43%
    Rank
    5/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    994 Andrews Avenue
    Ozark, AL 36360
    (334) 774-4913

    Grades: 6-8 | 458 students
  • Rank: #99.
    South Dale Middle School Math: 37% | Reading: 40%
    Rank
    4/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    309 Randolph Street
    Pinckard, AL 36371
    (334) 983-3077

    Grades: 5-8 | 424 students
  • Rank: #1010.
    Harry N Mixon Intermediate School Math: 36% | Reading: 39%
    Rank
    4/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    349 Sherrill Ln
    Ozark, AL 36360
    (334) 774-4912

    Grades: 3-5 | 430 students
  • Rank: #1111.
    Daleville High School Math: 25% | Reading: 42%
    Rank
    4/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    626 N Daleville Ave
    Daleville, AL 36322
    (334) 598-4461

    Grades: 7-12 | 430 students
  • Rank: #1212.
    A M Windham Elementary School Math: 22% | Reading: 32%
    Rank
    3/
    10
    Bottom 50%
    200 Heritage Drive
    Daleville, AL 36322
    (334) 598-4466

    Grades: K-6 | 509 students
  • Rank: #13-1513.- 15.
    Carroll High School Career Center Vocational School
    227 Faust Ave
    Ozark, AL 36360
    (334) 774-4949

    Grades: 9-12 | n/a student
  • Rank: #13-1513.- 15.860 Faust Ave
    Ozark, AL 36360
    (334) 774-4919

    Grades: PK-2 | 505 students
  • Rank: #13-1513.- 15.
    Opportunity Academy Alternative School
    1044 Andrews Ave
    Ozark, AL 36360
    (334) 774-5197

    Grades: n/a | n/a student
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