Should Your Child Go to College Right After High School?

Updated  November 09, 2016 |
Should Your Child Go to College Right After High School?
For some students, attending college immediately after high school is not the right choice. Keep reading to learn more about the pros and cons of this decision and to learn about some alternative options.

For many high school seniors, going to college after graduation is a given. But going to college immediately after high school is not the right choice for everyone. Keep reading to learn more about the pros and cons for attending college right after high school and to learn about some alternative options that may be available to you.

Reasons to Go to College After High School

While transitioning into college immediately after high school may not be the right choice for everyone, there certainly are some significant benefits you need to consider. Here are some things you should think about when deciding whether to take a year off before college:

  • Some studies have shown that many students who wait instead of going to college immediately after high school never end up going at all. In you take a job right after high school you may find yourself putting it off year after year and it could hurt you in the long run.
  • According to a Huffington Post report, those who choose not to go to college at all make as much as $800,000 less than college graduates over the course of their lifetime. Even if you only take a year off, you could be cutting into your lifetime salary.
  • If you do not go to college right after high school you could miss out on some life-changing experiences that can shape who you are and what you believe in. The habits and opinions you form as a young adult will stay with you for the rest of your life – you could miss out on some major opportunities to grow and mature if you put off going to college until you are older.
  • When you are ready to enter the job market you will likely start at the lowest end of the totem pole anyway, but attending college could give you access to resources you might not have otherwise. Many schools offer internship programs which can help you get your foot in the door and most schools offer some kind of job placement opportunities as well.
  • The friends you make during college will be some of your best friends for the rest of your life and college is a great place to start building a network. You never know how a connection you formed in college could benefit you later in life when it comes to your career.

These are just a few of the things you need to think about if you are considering waiting a year or two after high school to attend college. Every person’s situation is different so all of these things may not apply to you, but they should encourage you to think carefully about all sides of the issue before you make your decision.

The Benefits of Taking a Gap Year

Having learned about some of the benefits associated with starting college right after high school, you may be wondering if there are any downsides to making that decision. As it has already been mentioned, there are pros and cons for both sides of this issue and you should learn about the benefits of taking a year off before you make your decision. Here are some things to consider:

  • Many educators say that students who take a year off after high school to travel, work, or volunteer often end up returning to school more mature than when they left. Having some experience in the “real world” can help you to take better advantage of your college education because you already know what to expect, to some degree.
  • There are many programs out there that cater specifically to young adults and attending college first may make it more difficult to take advantage of them. For example, AmeriCorps and City Year are two volunteer programs that provide room and board for young adults who enter their program. For those who plan to travel on their own, it may take six months’ worth of working a job to save up.
  • Taking time off can give undecided students a chance to truly think about what they want to pursue. Not everyone leaves high school with a firm idea of what they want to do with their lives – it may take some time and some “real world” experience to shape that decision.
  • Many students who take AP classes and tough class loads during high school end up burning out and they need some time to breathe before continuing their education. Taking a year off from tests, homework, tutoring, and classes can be very beneficial for some students.

If you know that you are going to take a year off after high school you should still consider applying to college anyway. Many schools will allow you to defer your enrollment for a year and this gives you a back-up plan – something to return to at the end of your gap year.

Alternative Options to College After High School

It is fairly common for young adults to put off going to college right after high school and many never attend college at all. Just because you don’t go to college (either right after high school or at all) doesn’t mean that you can’t live a full and fulfilling life. Here are some excellent alternatives to college that you may consider pursuing after high school:

  • Travel the world. The world is vast and most people never see even a fraction of it outside their home state. College can be extremely transformative for a young adult, but so can traveling around the world, experiencing new customs and cultures. Traveling with a limited budget will help to teach you the value of a dollar and you will learn how to live independently.
  • Work or volunteer for a charity. Many charities do not require you to have a college degree – they are just glad to have people who are interested in supporting their mission. You can also pursue year-long programs like AmeriCorps or City Year.
  • Get an apprenticeship. Some careers do not require a degree but they may require an apprenticeship. If you are interested in some kind of trade, look for employers who may provide apprenticeships or who may help you attain the certifications you need for the job.
  • Start working early. If you aren’t sure exactly what you want to do with your life, taking a job could help you make that decision. Even if you end up hating the job you will still learn some valuable information about yourself – learning what you DON’T want to do is just as important as learning what you DO want to do.
  • Join the military. Many people who feel like college isn’t the right choice for them end up joining the military instead. Not only will you be serving your country if you joint the military, but you can receive top-notch training in a variety of career options, often while receiving free room and board. If you do decide to go to college later, the military may pay for it.
  • Start a business. Starting a business is always a risk and if you are going to fail, it is better to do it while you are young enough to recover from it fairly quickly. You do not necessarily need a business degree to start your own business – you just need an idea and a plan.

By now it should be obvious to you that while many students do attend college right after high school, not everyone does – this means that you don’t have to do it either if it doesn’t feel like the right choice. Just be sure to carefully consider your options before making a decision to ensure that it is the best fit for you.


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